History

456 products


  • The Road: A Story of Romans and Ways to the Past

    HarperCollins Publishers The Road: A Story of Romans and Ways to the Past

    1 in stock

    A TIMES BOOK OF THE YEAR ‘An absolute joy to read and an early contender for every list of History Books of the Year’ Sunday Telegraph ‘On nearly every page a random passage takes one’s breath away’ The Times Have you ever heard the march of legions on a lonely country road? For two thousand years, the roads the Romans built have determined the flow of ideas and folktales, where battles were fought and where pilgrims trod. Almost everyone in Britain lives close to a Roman road, if only we knew where to look. In the beginning was Watling Street, the first road scored on the land when the invading Romans arrived on a cold and alien Kentish shore in 43 CE. Campaign roads rolled out to all points of the compass, forcing their way inland and as the Britons fell back, the roads pursued them relentlessly, carrying troops, supplies and military despatches. In the years of fighting that followed, as the legions pushed onwards across what is now England, into Wales and north into Scotland in search of booty, mineral wealth, land and tribute, they left behind a vast road network, linking marching camps and forts, changing the landscape, etching the story of the Roman advance into the face of the land, channelling our lives today. Christopher Hadley, the acclaimed author of Hollow Places, takes us on a lyrical journey into this past, retracing and searching for an elusive Roman road that sprang from one of the busiest road hubs in Roman Britain. His passage is not always easy. Time and nature have erased many clues; bridges rotted and whole woods grew across the route. Carters found an easier ford downstream, and people broke up its milestones to mend new paths. Year after year the heavy clay swallowed whole lengths of it; the once mighty road became a bridleway, an overgrown hollow-way, a parched mark in the soil. Hadley leads us on a hunt to discover, in Hilaire Belloc’s phrase, ‘all that has arisen along the way’. Gathering traces of archaeology, history and landscape from poems, church walls, hag stones and cropmarks, oxlips, killing places, hauntings and immortals, and things buried too deep for archaeology, The Road is a mesmerising journey into two thousand years of history only now giving up its secrets.

    1 in stock

    £18.00

  • Britain in the Middle Ages: An Archaeological History

    HarperCollins Publishers Britain in the Middle Ages: An Archaeological History

    1 in stock

    As in ‘Britain B.C.’ and ‘Britain A.D.’ (also accompanied by Channel 4 series), eminent archaeologist Francis Pryor challenges familiar historical views of the Middle Ages by examining fresh evidence from the ground. The term 'Middle Ages' suggests a time between two other ages: a period when nothing much happened. In his radical reassessment, Francis Pryor shows that this is very far from the truth, and that the Middle Ages (approximately 800-1550) were actually the time when the modern world was born. This was when Britain moved from Late Antiquity into a world we can recognize as more or less familiar: roads and parishes became fixed; familiar institutions, such as the church and local government, came into being; industry became truly industrial; and international trade was now a routine process. Archaeology shows that the Middle Ages were far from static. Based on everyday, often humdrum evidence, it demonstrates that the later agricultural and industrial revolutions were not that unexpected, given what we now know of the later medieval period. Similarly, the explosion of British maritime power in the late 1700s had roots in the 15th century. The book stresses continuous development at the expense of ‘revolution', though the Black Death (1348), which killed a third of the population, did have a profound effect in loosening the grip of the feudal system. Labour became scarce and workers gained power; land became more available and the move to modern farming began. The Middle Ages can now be seen in a fresh light as an era of great inventiveness, as the author examines such topics as 'upward mobility'; the power of the Church; the role of the Guilds as precursors of trade unions; the transport infrastructure of roads, bridges and shipbuilders; and the increase in iron production.

    1 in stock

    £12.99

  • A Farewell to Ice: A Report from the Arctic

    Penguin Books Ltd A Farewell to Ice: A Report from the Arctic

    1 in stock

    'Astonishing ... beautiful, compelling and terrifying' Observer'Wadhams' writing sparkles ... a lyrical sense of wonder at the natural world ... essential reading ... may be the best reader-friendly account of the greenhouse effect available to date' John Burnside, New StatesmanIce is beautiful and complex. It regulates our planet's temperature. And it is vanishing - fast. Peter Wadhams, the world's leading expert on sea ice, draws on his lifetime's research in the Arctic region to illuminate what is happening, what it means for the future, and what can be done.'This most experienced and rational scientist states what so many other researchers privately fear but cannot publicly say' John Vidal, Guardian'Wadhams brings huge expertise to his subject - and he is an excellent writer' Martin Rees'Utterly extraordinary' Jonathon Porritt

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • A Short History of The Vietnam War

    Dorling Kindersley Ltd A Short History of The Vietnam War

    1 in stock

    This is the definitive story of one of the longest and most controversial conflicts in US history.Created in association with the Smithsonian Institution, this authoritative history of the Vietnam War examines the key figures and events of the conflict, and its lasting effects on the world. This history book for adults combines compelling text with maps and archive photography, A Short History of the Vietnam War is an all-encompassing showcase of every aspect of the fighting and the wider political landscape, from the struggle for civil rights to the treatment of prisoners.Inside the pages of this retelling of America's bloodiest conflict, you'll discover:- Vivid, moving, and informative details of the Vietnam war, including eyewitness accounts and iconic photographs - A clear and compelling account of the conflict, in short, self-contained events from the Battle of Ia Drang to the Tet Offensive and The Khmer Rouge - Biography spreads highlighting major military and political figures- Features on everyday life in the war offering additional context- Stunning image spreads displaying weapons, spy gear, and other equipment that defined the war- Maps and feature boxes provide additional information on major events during the conflictDetailed descriptions of events, from Operation Passage to Freedom to the evacuation of the US embassy in Saigon, are brought to life with eyewitness accounts and iconic photographs. Gallery pages present collections of infantry weapons, artillery, aircraft, and armoured vehicles, while diagrams and maps show exactly how battles and decisive moments unfolded, and biographical entries provide essential insight into the roles of significant individuals from Henry Kissinger to General Thieu.The perfect read for the military history enthusiast, A Short History of the Vietnam War is a stirring visual record of the suffering, sacrifice, and heroism that occurred in America's bloodiest ever conflicts.

    1 in stock

    £17.09

  • Treasures of World History: The Story Of Civilization in 50 Documents

    Welbeck Publishing Group Treasures of World History: The Story Of Civilization in 50 Documents

    1 in stock

    A spirited examination of world history, told through 50 key documents, by two celebrated historians and journalists. With a wealth of experience between them on political, social, cultural and military history, and today's current affairs, Peter Snow and Ann MacMillan are the perfect guides to appreciating the significance of each document. Chapters are devoted to each of the 50 documents across the political, military, artistic, and scientific spheres, and supported by additional contemporary images. The documents themselves have been researched from the collections of national archives, museums, libraries, and private collections around the world. The authors explain their criteria for selection and provide the pertinent details of each one, taking us on a journey from the scripts of the earliest civilizations through to momentous speeches and papers of today.

    1 in stock

    £27.00

  • Life and Afterlife in Ancient China

    Penguin Books Ltd Life and Afterlife in Ancient China

    1 in stock

    An epic new history of Ancient China told through the prism of a dozen extraordinary tombsThe three millennia up to the establishment of the first imperial Qin dynasty in 221 BC cemented many of the distinctive elements of Chinese civilisation still in place today: an extraordinarily challenging geography and environment, formidable infrastructure, a society based on the strict hierarchy of the family, a shared written script of characters, a cuisine founded on rice and millet, a material culture of ceramics, bronze, silk and jade, and a unique concept of the universe, in which ancestors continue to exist alongside the living. Records of these early achievements, and their diverse and unexpected expressions, often lie not in written history, but in how people marked the end of their lives: their dwellings for the afterlife. Tombs, and the treasures within them, are almost the only artefacts to survive from Ancient China; their scale and sophistication rivals their equivalents in Ancient Egypt.Jessica Rawson, one of the most eminent Western scholars of China, explores twelve grand tombs - each from a specific historical moment and place - showing how they reveal wider political, dynastic and cultural developments, culminating in the lavish ambition of the First Emperor's monument, guarded by his army of terracotta warriors. Beautifully illustrated and drawing on the latest archaeological discoveries, Life and Afterlife in Ancient China illuminates a constellation of beliefs about life and death very different from our own and provides a remarkable new perspective on one of the oldest civilisations in the world.

    1 in stock

    £36.00

  • How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America

    Dialogue How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America

    1 in stock

    ONE OF BARACK OBAMA'S FAVOURITE BOOKS OF THE YEARA NUMBER ONE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERLONGLISTED FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FOR NON-FICTION'A beautifully readable reminder of how much of our urgent, collective history resounds in places all around us that have been hidden in plain sight.' Afua Hirsch, author of Brit(ish)Beginning in his hometown of New Orleans, Clint Smith leads the reader on an unforgettable tour of monuments and landmarks - those that are honest about the past and those that are not - which offer an intergenerational story of how slavery has been central in shaping a nation's collective history, and our own.It is the story of the Monticello Plantation in Virginia, the estate where Thomas Jefferson wrote letters espousing the urgent need for liberty while enslaving more than four hundred people. It is the story of the Whitney Plantation, one of the only former plantations devoted to preserving the experience of the enslaved people whose lives and work sustained it. It is the story of Angola, a former plantation-turned-maximum-security prison in Louisiana that is filled with Black men who work across the 18,000-acre land for virtually no pay. And it is the story of Blandford Cemetery, the final resting place of tens of thousands of Confederate soldiers.A deeply researched and transporting exploration of the legacy of slavery and its imprint on centuries of American history, How the Word Is Passed illustrates how some of our most essential stories are hidden in plain view - whether in places we might drive by on our way to work, holidays such as Juneteenth or entire neighbourhoods like downtown Manhattan, where the brutal history of the trade in enslaved men, women and children has been deeply imprinted.How the Word is Passed is a landmark book that offers a new understanding of the hopeful role that memory and history can play in making sense of the United States. Chosen as a book of the year by President Barack Obama, The Economist, Time, the New York Times and more, fans of Brit(ish) and Natives will be utterly captivated.What readers are saying about How the Word is Passed:'How the Word Is Passed frees history, frees humanity to reckon honestly with the legacy of slavery. We need this book.' Ibram X. Kendi, Number One New York Times bestselling author'An extraordinary contribution to the way we understand ourselves.' Julian Lucas, New York Times Book Review'The detail and depth of the storytelling is vivid and visceral, making history present and real.' Hope Wabuke, NPR'This isn't just a work of history, it's an intimate, active exploration of how we're still constructing and distorting our history." Ron Charles, The Washington Post'In re-examining neighbourhoods, holidays and quotidian sites, Smith forces us to reconsider what we think we know about American history.' Time'A history of slavery in this country unlike anything you've read before.' Entertainment Weekly'A beautifully written, evocative, and timely meditation on the way slavery is commemorated in the United States.' Annette Gordon-Reed, Pulitzer Prize-winning author

    1 in stock

    £9.99

  • The Levelling Sea: The Story of a Cornish Haven and the Age of Sail

    HarperCollins Publishers The Levelling Sea: The Story of a Cornish Haven and the Age of Sail

    1 in stock

    The story of Britain’s colourful maritime past seen through the changing fortunes of the Cornish port of Falmouth. Within the space of few years, during the 1560s and 1570s, a maritime revolution took place in England that would contribute more than anything to the transformation of the country from a small rebel state on the fringes of Europe into a world power. Until then, it was said, there was only one Englishman capable of sailing across the Atlantic. Yet within ten years an English ship with an English crew was circumnavigating the world. At the same time in Cornwall, in the Fal estuary, just a single building – a lime kiln – existed where the port of Falmouth would emerge. Yet by the end of the eighteenth century, Falmouth would be one of the busiest harbours in the world. ‘The Levelling Sea’ uses the story of Falmouth’s spectacular rise and fall to explore wider questions about the sea and its place in history and imagination. Drawing on his own deep connection with Cornwall, award-winning author Philip Marsden writes unforgettably about the power of the sea and its ability to produce greed on a piratical scale, dizzying corruption, and grand and tragic aspirations.

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • Leviathan: The Rise of Britain as a World Power

    HarperCollins Publishers Leviathan: The Rise of Britain as a World Power

    1 in stock

    In this paperback of his acclaimed and wide-ranging study, David Scott challenges traditional assumptions about how Britain achieved her global might. Shortlisted for the Duke of Westminster Medal for Military Literature 2013 Navigating the 300 years between the Tudor accession and the loss of the American colonies Leviathan charts one of history’s greatest transformations: the rise of Britain as the world’s most formidable maritime power. From the chaos of the Wars of the Roses, Henry VIII’s split with Rome and Oliver Cromwell’s Parliamentary regime, David Scott’s masterly narrative explodes traditional assumptions to present a much darker interpretation of this extraordinary story. Powered by a rapidly growing navy, a rapacious merchant marine, resilient politics, bigotry and religious fanaticism, warmongering and slavery, this candid book is required reading for all those wishing to understand how Britain achieved her global might.

    1 in stock

    £13.49

  • Rubicon: The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic

    Little, Brown Book Group Rubicon: The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic

    1 in stock

    'The book that really held me, in fact, obsessed me, was Rubicon . . . This is narrative history at its best. Bloody and labyrinthine political intrigue and struggle, brilliant oratory, amazing feats of conquest and cruelty' Ian McEwan, Books of the Year, Guardian'Re-evaluating Rome for a new generation' Robert Harris, Sunday Times'Marvellously readable' Niall FergusonThe Roman Republic was the most remarkable state in history. What began as a small community of peasants camped among marshes and hills ended up ruling the known world. Rubicon paints a vivid portrait of the Republic at the climax of its greatness - the same greatness which would herald the catastrophe of its fall. It is a story of incomparable drama. This was the century of Julius Caesar, the gambler whose addiction to glory led him to the banks of the Rubicon, and beyond; of Cicero, whose defence of freedom would make him a byword for eloquence; of Spartacus, the slave who dared to challenge a superpower; of Cleopatra, the queen who did the same.Tom Holland brings to life this strange and unsettling civilization, with its extremes of ambition and self-sacrifice, bloodshed and desire. Yet alien as it was, the Republic still holds up a mirror to us. Its citizens were obsessed by celebrity chefs, all-night dancing and exotic pets; they fought elections in law courts and were addicted to spin; they toppled foreign tyrants in the name of self-defence. Two thousand years may have passed, but we remain the Romans' heirs.SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2004 SAMUEL JOHNSON PRIZESHORTLISTED FOR THE 2003 HISTORY BOOK OF THE YEAR AT THE BRITISH BOOK AWARDS

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • Give Us Freedom: The Women who Revolutionised the Modern World

    Little, Brown Book Group Give Us Freedom: The Women who Revolutionised the Modern World

    1 in stock

    'They will have to choose between giving us freedom or giving us death'So said,in 1913 ,the brilliant orator and suffragette ,Emmeline Pankhurst, just one of the inspiring women who won the vote for women. She remains a heroine for those determined to go to any lengths to change our world and one of those inspirational souls who feature in Rosalind Miles' gallery of famous, infamous and little-know rebels. We begin with the French Revolution when women took on the fraternite of man, then it's off to America to round up the rebels fighting side by side for freedom with their men, before heading back to Britain to witness the courage of the suffragettes. From Australia to Iceland, from India to China and from many other countries, we track women who - often at a very high cost to themselves - have stood up to age-old cruelties and injustices. Recording the important milestones in the long march of women towards equality through a colourful pageant of astonishing women, we chart the birth of modern womanhood. Women in sport, women in business, women in religion, women in politics and women in power - all female life is there. We end in the present day thrilled with what women have done - and can and will do.Give us Freedom is as brave and as brilliant as its heroines.Formerly published as Rebel Women

    1 in stock

    £10.99

  • Pirates Of Barbary: Corsairs, Conquests and Captivity in the 17th-Century Mediterranean

    Vintage Publishing Pirates Of Barbary: Corsairs, Conquests and Captivity in the 17th-Century Mediterranean

    1 in stock

    From the coast of Southern Europe to Morocco and the Ottoman states of Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli, Christian and Muslim seafarers met in bustling ports to swap religions, to battle and to trade goods and sales - raiding as far as Ireland and Iceland in search of their human currency.Studying the origins of these men, their culture and practices, Adrian Tinniswood expertly recreates the twilight world of the corsairs and uncovers a truly remarkable clash of civilisations Drawing on a wealth of material, from furious royal proclamations to the private letters of pirates and their victims, as well as recent Islamic accounts, Pirates of Barbary provides a new perspectives of the corsairs and a fascinating insight into what it meant to sacrifice all you have for a life so violent, so uncertain and so alien that it sets you apart from the rest of mankind.

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • The Frontier Below: The Past, Present and Future of Our Quest to Go Deeper Underwater

    HarperCollins Publishers The Frontier Below: The Past, Present and Future of Our Quest to Go Deeper Underwater

    1 in stock

    Triumphs and disasters in the deep sea This is a journey through time and water, to the bottom of the ocean and the future of our planet. We do not see the ocean when we look at the water that blankets more than two thirds of our planet. We only see the entrance to it. Beyond that entrance is a world hostile to humans, yet critical to our survival. The first divers to enter that world held their breath and splashed beneath the surface, often clutching rocks to pull them down. Over centuries, they invented wooden diving bells, clumsy diving suits, and unwieldy contraptions in attempts to go deeper and stay longer. But each advance was fraught with danger, as the intruders had to survive the crushing weight of water, or the deadly physiological effects of breathing compressed air. The vertical odyssey continued when explorers squeezed into heavy steel balls dangling on cables, or slung beneath floats filled with flammable gasoline. Plunging into the narrow trenches between the tectonic plates of the Earth’s crust, they eventually reached the bottom of the ocean in the same decade that men first walked on the moon. Today, as nations scramble to exploit the resources of the ocean floor, The Frontier Below recalls a story of human endeavour that took 2,000 years to travel seven miles, then investigates how we will explore the ocean in the future. Meticulously researched and drawing extensively on unpublished sources and personal interviews, The Frontier Below is the untold story of the pioneers who had the right stuff, but were forgotten because they went in the wrong direction.

    1 in stock

    £22.50

  • The Great Explorers: Forty of the Greatest Men and Women Who Changed Our Perception of the World

    Thames & Hudson Ltd The Great Explorers: Forty of the Greatest Men and Women Who Changed Our Perception of the World

    1 in stock

    What inspires explorers to push back the boundaries of the known world? Why do they risk their lives in unforgiving conditions far from home? How do they survive at the limits of human endurance? Who are the great pioneers of land, sea and space? Where next? This book charts the great expeditions of forty of the world’s most intrepid explorers, from da Gama to Gagarin. Gertrude Bell plotted the desert sands, politics and poetry of Arabia; Francis Garnier was driven almost insane on the banks of the Mekong; Edward Wilson twice tried to reach the South Pole with Scott; Nain Singh mapped the vast spaces of Tibet, counting every step. Written by a host of distinguished travel writers, broadcasters and historians, here are journeys to savour from every corner of the earth – and beyond.

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • Digging for Richard III: The Search for the Lost King

    Thames & Hudson Ltd Digging for Richard III: The Search for the Lost King

    1 in stock

    Take a cast of archaeologists and historians who inhabit different worlds. Add a medieval king who died in battle, and was revived by Shakespeare as the ultimate anti-hero. Throw in a forensic quest with almost unbelievable twists, and a theatrical modern burial with no parallel, and you have the material for an irresistible story for our times. In the hands of a leading archaeologist and award-winning journalist, the search for a king’s grave becomes the page-turning, entertaining, informed narrative that makes Digging for Richard III the must-read title on the most sensational archaeological find for generations.

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • The Age Of Revolution: 1789-1848

    Little, Brown Book Group The Age Of Revolution: 1789-1848

    1 in stock

    Eric Hobsbawm traces with brilliant anlytical clarity the transformation brought about in evry sphere of European life by the Dual revolution - the 1789 French revolution and the Industrial Revolution that originated in Britain. This enthralling and original account highlights the significant sixty years when industrial capitalism established itself in Western Europe and when Europe established the domination over the rest of the world it was to hold for half a century.

    1 in stock

    £13.49

  • Lancaster And York: The Wars of the Roses

    Vintage Publishing Lancaster And York: The Wars of the Roses

    1 in stock

    A lucid, gripping account of the human side of one of the bloodiest chapters of British history. The war between the houses of Lancaster and York for the throne of England was characterised by treachery, deceit and - at St Albans, Blore Hill and Towton, - some of the goriest and most dramatic battles on England's soil. Between 1455 and 1487 the royal coffers were bankrupted, and the conflict resulted in the downfall of the houses of Lancaster and York and the emergence of the illustrious Tudor dynasty.Alison Weir's account focuses on the people and personalities involved in the conflict. At the centre of the book stands Henry VI, the pious king whose mental instability led to political chaos, Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York and Henry's rival, and most important of all, Margaret of Anjou, Henry's wife who took up her arms in her husband's cause and battled for many years in a violent man's world.'A joy to read' Economist

    1 in stock

    £13.49

  • Persian Fire: The First World Empire, Battle for the West - 'Magisterial' Books of the Year, Independent

    Little, Brown Book Group Persian Fire: The First World Empire, Battle for the West - 'Magisterial' Books of the Year, Independent

    1 in stock

    Tom Holland's bestselling account of the world's very first clash of civilisations between the Persians and the Greeks in 480BC'Magisterial... told with great authority and a novelistic colour and verve' Books of the Year, Independent'Holland has a rare eye for detail, drama and the telling anecdote'Dominic Sandbrook, Daily Telegraph'An unequivocal argument for the relevance of ancient history' Observer'Holland brings this tumultuous, epoch-making period dazzlingly to life' William Napier, Independent on SundayIn the fifth century BC, a global superpower was determined to bring truth and order to what it regarded as two terrorist states. The superpower was Persia, incomparably rich in ambition, gold and men. The terrorist states were Athens and Sparta, eccentric cities in a poor and mountainous backwater: Greece. The story of how their citizens took on the most powerful man on the planet is as heart-stopping as any episode in history.

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • Millennium: The End of the World and the Forging of Christendom

    Little, Brown Book Group Millennium: The End of the World and the Forging of Christendom

    1 in stock

    Of all the civilisations existing in the year 1000, that of Western Europe seemed the unlikeliest candidate for future greatness. Compared to the glittering empires of Byzantium or Islam, the splintered kingdoms on the edge of the Atlantic appeared impoverished, fearful and backward. But the anarchy of these years proved to be, not the portents of the end of the world, as many Christians had dreaded, but rather the birthpangs of a radically new order.MILLENNIUM is a stunning panoramic account of the two centuries on either side of the apocalyptic year 1000. This was the age of Canute, William the Conqueror and Pope Gregory VII, of Vikings, monks and serfs, of the earliest castles and the invention of knighthood, and of the primal conflict between church and state. The story of how the distinctive culture of Europe - restless, creative and dynamic - was forged from out of the convulsions of these extraordinary times is as fascinating and as momentous as any in history.

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • The Time Traveller's Guide to Elizabethan England

    Vintage Publishing The Time Traveller's Guide to Elizabethan England

    1 in stock

    'A fresh and funny book that wears its learning lightly' IndependentDiscover the era of William Shakespeare and Elizabeth I through the sharp, informative and hilarious eyes of Ian Mortimer. We think of Queen Elizabeth I's reign (1558-1603) as a golden age. But what was it actually like to live in Elizabethan England? If you could travel to the past and walk the streets of London in the 1590s, where would you stay? What would you eat? What would you wear? Would you really have a sense of it being a glorious age? And if so, how would that glory sit alongside the vagrants, diseases, violence, sexism and famine of the time? In this book Ian Mortimer reveals a country in which life expectancy is in the early thirties, people still starve to death and Catholics are persecuted for their faith. Yet it produces some of the finest writing in the English language, some of the most magnificent architecture, and sees Elizabeth's subjects settle in America and circumnavigate the globe. Welcome to a country that is, in all its contradictions, the very crucible of the modern world.'Vivid trip back to the 16th century...highly entertaining book' Guardian

    1 in stock

    £12.99

  • Night Raid: The True Story of the First Victorious British Para Raid of WWII

    Little, Brown Book Group Night Raid: The True Story of the First Victorious British Para Raid of WWII

    1 in stock

    The loss of British bombers over Occupied Europe began to reach alarming levels in 1941. Could it be that the Germans were using a sophisticated form of radar to direct their night fighters and anti-aircraft guns at the British bombers? British aerial reconnaissance discovered what seemed to be a rotating radar tower on a clifftop at Bruneval, near Le Havre. The truth must be revealed. The decision was taken to launch a daring raid on the Bruneval site to try and capture the technology for further examination. The planned airborne assault would be extremely risky. The parachute regiment had only been formed a year before on Churchill's insistence. This night raid would test the men to the extreme limits of their abilities. Night Raid tells the gripping tale of this mission from the planning stages, to the failed rehearsals when the odds seemed stacked against them, to the night of the raid itself, and the scientific secrets that were discovered thanks to the paras' precious cargo - the German radar. Its capture was of immense importance in the next stages of the war and the mission itself marked the birth of the legend of the 'Red Devils'.

    1 in stock

    £8.99

  • Pirate: The Buccaneer's (Unofficial) Manual

    Thames & Hudson Ltd Pirate: The Buccaneer's (Unofficial) Manual

    1 in stock

    Pirates have a well-earned bad reputation, and this book invites the reader to join their ranks. Here you will discover everything the aspiring pirate needs to know in order to join a crew and start – and possibly end – a life of adventure, plunder and glory. The hopeful initiate is educated on all manner of piratical concerns: the history of this dishonourable tradition stretching back to ancient Greece and Rome; essentials of language and dress; notably dastardly pirate role models from around the world, including Blackbeard and Captain Kidd, but also some less well known, such as Eustace the Monk and Anne Bonny and Mary Read; what to expect of life at sea; the best weapons to have; how to capture a prize on the high seas, and much more. Author Stephen Turnbull has studied the archives and travelled to pirate locations around the world in researching this fictionalized account, written as a pirate’s training manual for a young recruit, but solidly grounded in fact, based on the year 1793, a golden age for piracy. His lively and engaging manual provides answers to all the questions you may have wondered about – did they really walk the plank (probably not); keep parrots; bury treasure and mark it with an X on the map? And you may be surprised to learn what their usual style of hat actually was. Illustrated throughout with contemporary artifacts, documents and prints, as well as modern reconstructions, this light-hearted but informative guide will captivate readers young and old, and covers with authority every aspect of what it was really like to be a pirate.

    1 in stock

    £11.66

  • Amsterdam: A History of the World's Most Liberal City

    Little, Brown Book Group Amsterdam: A History of the World's Most Liberal City

    1 in stock

    Amsterdam is not just any city. Despite its relative size it has stood alongside its larger cousins - Paris, London, Berlin - and has influenced the modern world to a degree that few other cities have. Sweeping across the city's colourful thousand year history, Amsterdam will bring the place to life: its sights and smells; its politics and people. Concentrating on two significant periods - the late 1500s to the mid 1600s and then from the Second World War to the present, Russell Shorto's masterful biography looks at Amsterdam's central preoccupations. Just as fin-de-siecle Vienna was the birthplace of psychoanalysis, seventeenth century Amsterdam was the wellspring of liberalism, and today it is still a city that takes individual freedom very seriously. A wonderfully evocative book that takes Amsterdam's dramatic past and present and populates it with a whole host of colourful characters, Amsterdam is the definitive book on this great city.

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • The Rainborowes

    Vintage Publishing The Rainborowes

    1 in stock

    The Rainborowes bridges two generations and two worlds, weaving together the lives of the Rainborowe clan as they struggle to forge a better life for themselves and a better future for humankind in the New World. Starting with William Rainborowe, a prominent merchant-mariner and shipmaster, and his equally formidable sons and daughters between 1630 and 1660, we follow their astonishing story through the Civil War, the Putney debates, and settling in America. The Rainborowes explains America and mourns England’s failed revolution. It spans oceans and ideologies and encompasses personal tragedies and triumphs, the death of kings and the birth of nations.Using rare printed material from the period and unpublished manuscripts from collections in Britain and America The Rainborowes recreates day-to-day life on both sides of the Atlantic during one of the most tumultuous periods in Western history. In their efforts to build a paradise on earth, the Rainborowes and their friends encounter pirates and witches, prophets and princes, Muslem militants and Mohican Indians. They build new societies. They are ordinary men and women, and they do an extraordinary thing.They change the world.

    1 in stock

    £11.99

  • Masters of War: A Visual History of Military Personnel from Commanders to Frontline Fighters

    Dorling Kindersley Ltd Masters of War: A Visual History of Military Personnel from Commanders to Frontline Fighters

    1 in stock

    Who were the men and women behind history's most fascinating and famous wars? This military history book reveals it all.Packed with profiles of influential leaders, famous wars and information on weapons and clothing, this military book captivates the imagination of military buffs young and old.Explore war throughout history. The pages of this intriguing military biography look at the leaders of past wars, who they were and what made them great. It includes:- In-depth profiles of key military personnel with a portrait, timeline of achievements, and key artefacts- Items associated with a soldier, battle, or army - such as uniforms, personal effects, armour and weapons, and medals - all represented in photographic catalogues- Striking double-page paintings and photographs presented to showcase key battles- Detailed photography of weapons and clothing, archive images and clear textThe guide to military history features more than 100 key war generals and military leaders from Alexander the Great and Charlemagne Ghenghis Khan to Ulysses Grant and Winston Churchill. Masters of War takes you on a journey through military history and the people behind the battles - starting in ancient Egypt through to the middle ages and featuring modern wars like World War I and II, Vietnam War, and conflicts in the Middle East.Biographies reveal the details of each leader's life and achievements, while paintings, photographs, and artefacts bring their stories to life. The visual military guide also features the uniforms and equipment of soldiers throughout history. Each object is accompanied by a short description of its importance, from the swords and spears of early warfare to the guns and uniforms of the modern era.

    1 in stock

    £25.00

  • The Last Train: A Family History of the Final Solution

    HarperCollins Publishers The Last Train: A Family History of the Final Solution

    1 in stock

    ‘Haunting.’ Jonathan Freedland ‘Powerful.’ Daniel Finkelstein The profoundly moving and deeply intimate story of one Jewish family’s fate in the Holocaust, following the thread from Germany to Latvia and to Britain. In November 1941, Peter Bradley's grandparents, Sally and Bertha Brandes, were deported from their home in Bamberg to their deaths in Latvia. The Last Train is a profound and moving homage to Peter’s lost family and to his father who rarely spoke of the traumas through which he lived. It is also his attempt to understand, through the prism of his family’s story, how the Nazis came to conceive and implement the Final Solution. Why did Sally and Bertha’s fellow citizens put them on the train that carried them to the killing fields? Why did the democracies which so loudly condemned Hitler’s persecution of the Jews deny them sanctuary? And why, when Peter's father finally reached Britain after five terrible months in a Nazi concentration camp, was he arrested as an 'enemy alien'? The quest for answers led Peter to explore the origins and evolution of an ancient hatred and the struggles against it of each generation of his family, from the Reformation, through the Enlightenment and the Age of Reform, to the catastrophe of the Holocaust. This is the powerful, poignant story of Peter’s journey through family papers and archives, through works of scholarship and the testimony of survivors, and from Bavaria and Buchenwald to the mass graves of the Baltic. And, reflecting on what he learned, he asks: in the events of our own times, we are all perpetrators or bystanders or resisters; which of those roles do we choose for ourselves?

    1 in stock

    £9.99

  • A Mudlark's Treasures: London in Fragments

    Quarto Publishing PLC A Mudlark's Treasures: London in Fragments

    1 in stock

    Mudlarking enthusiast Ted Sandling takes us on a riveting journey along the Thames foreshore and back into the past.'A beautiful book.' Daily Mail'Exhilaratingly curious.' Evening Standard'Gripping.' Spectator'Brilliant.' Penelope Lively'Indefatigably researched.' Country Life'Wonderful, quirky.' Tracy Chevalier Mudlarking, the act of searching the Thames foreshore for items of value, has a long tradition in London. In the late 18th and 19th centuries, mudlarks were small boys grubbing a living from scrap. Modern-day mudlark Ted Sandling shares his passion for unearthing relics of the past from the banks of the Thames and describes his fifty most evocative finds. From Roman tiles to elegant Georgian pottery, these objects create a mosaic of everyday London life through the centuries, touching on the journeys, pleasures, vices and industries of a world city. This book celebrates the beauty of small things, and the intangible connection that found objects give us to the past. The Thames presents treasures with a delightful serendipity: it gives up a hundred random objects, and it is up to the finder to discover their stories. That is the joy of mudlarking: that after every trip to the river you know more than you did before. Chance connections with something that was once treasured, that was once lost and has now been found again. Even the meanest broken fragments tells a story of this great city. 'The significance of these fragments lies in the stories they tell us about the everyday lives of the people to whom there are no monuments or blue plaques.' TLS A fully illustrated edition of this book is also available under the title LONDON IN FRAGMENTS: A Mudlark's Treasures.

    1 in stock

    £8.99

  • Unsung: Unheralded Narratives of American Slavery and Abolition

    Penguin Books Ltd Unsung: Unheralded Narratives of American Slavery and Abolition

    1 in stock

    A groundbreaking collection of abolitionist writing from throughout the history of American slaveryFrom the beginning of the transatlantic slave trade to the ambiguity of the reconstruction era, resistance and protest writing were a central part of slavery in America, and - ultimately - played a crucial role in its abolition. Placing well-known abolitionist writing alongside less celebrated and little-known accounts of everyday lives and activism, Unsung makes the case for focusing on the histories of black people as agents and architects of their own struggle and ultimate liberation.

    1 in stock

    £15.29

  • The Wreckers: A Story of Killing Seas, False Lights and Plundered Ships

    HarperCollins Publishers The Wreckers: A Story of Killing Seas, False Lights and Plundered Ships

    1 in stock

    From the bestselling author of ‘The Lighthouse Stevensons’, a gripping history of the drama and danger of wrecking since the 18th-century – and the often grisly ingenuity of British wreckers, scavengers of the sea. A fine wreck has always represented sport, pleasure, treasure, and in many cases, the difference between living well and just getting by. The Cornish were supposedly so ferocious that notices of shipwrecks were given out during morning service by the minister, whilst the congregation concocted elaborate theological justifications for drowning the survivors. Treeless islanders relied on the harvest of storms to furnish themselves with rafters, boat hulls, fence-posts and floors. In other places, false lights were set up with grisly ingenuity along the coast to lure boats to destruction. With romance, insight and dry wit, Bella Bathurst traces the history of wrecking, looting and salvaging in the British Isles since the 18th-century and leading up to the present day. ‘For a fully laden general cargo to run to ground in an accessible position is more or less like having Selfridges crash-land in your back garden,’ she writes. ‘A Selfridges with the prices removed’. Far from being a black-and-white crime, wrecking is often seen as opaque by its practitioners – the divisions between theft and recovery are small. No successful legal prosecution has ever been brought; the RNLI was founded by wreckers – even today lifeboat crews maintain the right to claim salvage. In settings ranging from the eerily perambulatory Goodwin Sands to the wreck-strewn waters off the coast of Durham, these murky tales of resourcefulness and quick-witted opportunism open a beguiling vista of life at the rough edges of our land and legality.

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • Viking: The Norse Warrior's (Unofficial) Manual

    Thames & Hudson Ltd Viking: The Norse Warrior's (Unofficial) Manual

    1 in stock

    The fifth instalment in this popular and highly successful series, Viking follows on from Legionary, Gladiator, Knight and Samurai, your guide to the Norse world of the tenth century ad. Discover everything you will need to become a successful Viking warrior: how to join a war band; what to look for in a good leader; how to behave at a feast; what weapons and armour to choose; how to fight in a shield wall; where to go raiding; how to plunder a monastery and ransom a monk; how to navigate at sea; and what to expect if you die gloriously in battle. Modern reconstructions and ancient artefacts, including 16 pages of brilliant colour images, will immerse the reader visually in the Viking world. The humorous text peppered with quotes from sagas and chronicles will take you on an engrossing journey from joining a raiding party to how to die gloriously.

    1 in stock

    £12.95

  • Women in the War

    HarperCollins Publishers Women in the War

    1 in stock

    ‘An important contribution to our recent history’ ANDREW MARR ‘Absorbing and important’ JOAN BAKEWELL ‘One of my favourite reads of 2021’ GARETH RUSSELL Poignant and inspiring, Women in the War tells the first-hand stories of ten of the last surviving female members of Britain's 'Greatest Generation'. Whether flying Spitfires to the frontline, aiding code breaking at Bletchley Park, plotting the Battle of the Atlantic or working with Churchill in the Cabinet War Rooms, each of these women made a crucial contribution to the conflict overseas and helped to buttress the home front. Here they recount their remarkable experiences during the Second World War, recalling how their formative years were shaped by danger and trauma, and how friendship and romance fortified their spirits. Drawing on the insight that comes with age, they contemplate how the conflict helped women prove their worth, transforming society and sparking the later battles for equal rights. With a reporter’s eye for detail, Lucy Fisher artfully weaves together moving contemporary interviews with gripping wartime diaries and letters. This is a vivid oral history that will stay with you long after you've put it down.

    1 in stock

    £9.99

  • Wild Grass: China's Revolution from Below

    Penguin Books Ltd Wild Grass: China's Revolution from Below

    1 in stock

    'Illuminating ... Johnson has not only lifted a corner of the curtain which covers China's reality beyond its glittering eastern cities; he has drawn the whole curtain' The Times Literary SupplementIn Wild Grass, Pulitzer Prize-winning Ian Johnson describes a China caught between the desire for change percolating up from below and the ossified political structure above. He recounts the stories of three ordinary people who find themselves finding oppression and government corruption, risking imprisonment and even death. A young architecture student, a bereaved daughter, and a peasant legal clerk are the unlikely heroes of these stories, private citizens cast by unexpected circumstances into surprising roles.

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • This Sovereign Isle: Britain In and Out of Europe

    Penguin Books Ltd This Sovereign Isle: Britain In and Out of Europe

    1 in stock

    THE TOP TEN SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLERGeography comes before history. Islands cannot have the same history as continental plains. The United Kingdom is a European country, but not the same kind of European country as Germany, Poland or Hungary. For most of the 150 centuries during which Britain has been inhabited it has been on the edge, culturally and literally, of mainland Europe.In this succinct book, Tombs shows that the decision to leave the EU is historically explicable - though not made historically inevitable - by Britain's very different historical experience, especially in the twentieth century, and because of our more extensive and deeper ties outside Europe. He challenges the orthodox view that Brexit was due solely to British or English exceptionalism: in choosing to leave the EU, the British, he argues, were in many ways voting as typical Europeans.

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • Franklin: Tragic Hero of Polar Navigation

    Faber & Faber Franklin: Tragic Hero of Polar Navigation

    1 in stock

    In 1845 Captain Sir John Franklin led a large, well equipped expedition to complete the conquest of the Canadian Arctic, to find the fabled North West Passage connecting the North Atlantic to the North Pacific. Yet Franklin, his ships and his men were fated never to return. The cause of their loss remains a mystery. In Franklin, Andrew Lambert presents a gripping account of the worst catastrophe in the history of British exploration, and the dark tales of cannibalism that surround the fate of those involved.Shocked by the disappearance of all 129 officers and men, and sickened by reports of cannibalism, the Victorians re-created Franklin as the brave Christian hero who laid down his life, and those of his men. Later generations have been more sceptical about Franklin and his supposed selfless devotion to duty. But does either view really explain why this outstanding scientific navigator found his ships trapped in pack ice seventy miles from magnetic north?In 2014 Canadian explorers discovered the remains of Franklin's ship. His story is now being brought to a whole new generation, and Andrew Lambert's book gives the best analysis of what really happened to the crew. In its incredible detail and its arresting narrative, Franklin re-examines the life and the evidence with Lambert's customary brilliance and authority. In this riveting story of the Arctic, he discovers a new Franklin: a character far more complex, and more truly heroic, than previous histories have allowed. '[A]nother brilliant piece of research combined with old-fashioned detective work . . . utterly compelling.' Dr Amanda Foreman

    1 in stock

    £13.49

  • A Short History of Seafaring

    Dorling Kindersley Ltd A Short History of Seafaring

    1 in stock

    Discover over 5000 years of seafaring history, packed with first-hand accounts of triumphs and disasters A fascinating journey through more than 5,000 years of seafaring history in this essential guide to the most impressive seafaring tales, explorers, and maritime environments. For more than 5,000 years, the seas have challenged, rewarded, and punished the brave sailors who set forth to explore it. This history of the seas and sailing tells the remarkable story of those individuals - whether they lived to tell the tale themselves or not. From the early Polynesian seafarers and the first full circumnavigations of the globe, to explorers picking their way through the coral reefs of the West Indies, this book tells the compelling story of life at sea that lies behind man's search for new lands, new trade, conquest, and uncharted waters. Charting the great milestones of nautical history from the discovery of America to the establishment of the Royal Navy, the naval history of the American Civil War, the Battle of Midway and modern piracy the book sets all of them in their cultural and historical context. Previously published as The Conquest of the Ocean, A Short History of Seafaring is a unique compendium of awe-inspiring tales of epic sea voyages and great feats of seamanship, navigation, endurance, and ingenuity.

    1 in stock

    £9.99

  • The Ruin of All Witches: Life and Death in the New World

    Penguin Books Ltd The Ruin of All Witches: Life and Death in the New World

    1 in stock

    *THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER**SHORTLISTED FOR THE WOLFSON HISTORY PRIZE**A TIMES, SUNDAY TIMES AND BBC HISTORY BOOK OF THE YEAR*'A bona fide historical classic' Sunday Times'Simply one of the best history books I have ever read' BBC HistoryIn the frontier town of Springfield in 1651, peculiar things begin to happen. Precious food spoils, livestock ails and property vanishes. People suffer fits and are plagued by strange visions and dreams. Children sicken and die. As tensions rise, rumours spread of witches and heretics, and the community becomes tangled in a web of spite, distrust and denunciation. The finger of suspicion falls on a young couple struggling to make a home and feed their children: Hugh Parsons the irascible brickmaker and his troubled wife, Mary. It will be their downfall.The Ruin of All Witches tells the dark, real-life folktale of witch-hunting in a remote Massachusetts plantation. These were the turbulent beginnings of colonial America, when English settlers' dreams of love and liberty, of founding a 'city on a hill', gave way to paranoia and terror, enmity and rage. Drawing on uniquely rich, previously neglected source material, Malcolm Gaskill brings to life a New World existence steeped in the divine and the diabolic, in curses and enchantments, and precariously balanced between life and death.Through the gripping micro-history of a family tragedy, we glimpse an entire society caught in agonized transition between supernatural obsessions and the age of enlightenment. We see, in short, the birth of the modern world.'Gaskill tells this deeply tragic story with immense empathy and compassion, as well as historical depth' The Guardian 'As compelling as a campfire story ... Gaskill brings this sinister past vividly to life' Erica Wagner, Financial Times

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • Crusoe's Island: A Rich and Curious History of Pirates, Castaways and Madness

    Faber & Faber Crusoe's Island: A Rich and Curious History of Pirates, Castaways and Madness

    1 in stock

    Originally named Juan Fernández, the island of Robinson Crusoe in the South Pacific was the inspiration for Defoe's classic novel about the adventures of a shipwrecked sailor. Yet the complex story of Britain's relationship with this distant, tiny island is more surprising, more colourful and considerably darker. Drawing on voyage accounts, journal entries, maps and illustrations, acclaimed historian Andrew Lambert brings to life the voices of the visiting sailors, scientists, writers and artists, from the early encounters of the 1500s and the perilous journeys of the eighteenth-century explorers, to the naval conflicts of the First World War and the environmental concerns of more recent years. Crusoe's Island explores why we are still not willing to give up on the specks of land at the far ends of the earth.

    1 in stock

    £8.99

  • In The Shadow Of The Sword: The Battle for Global Empire and the End of the Ancient World

    Little, Brown Book Group In The Shadow Of The Sword: The Battle for Global Empire and the End of the Ancient World

    1 in stock

    A SUNDAY TIMES TOP TEN BESTSELLER'A stunning blockbuster' Robert Fisk'A brilliant tour de force of revisionist scholarship and thrilling storytelling' Simon Sebag Montefiore'A compelling detective story of the highest order' Sunday Times'Tom Holland has an enviable gift for summoning up the colour, the individuals and animation of the past' IndependentIn the 6th century AD, the Near East was divided between two venerable empires: the Persian and the Roman. A hundred years on and one had vanished forever, while the other seemed almost finished. Ruling in their place were the Arabs: an upheaval so profound that it spelt, in effect, the end of the ancient world. In the Shadow of the Sword explores how this came about. Spanning from Constantinople to the Arabian desert, and starring some of the most remarkable rulers who ever lived, he tells a story vivid with drama, horror, and startling achievement.

    1 in stock

    £13.49

  • Rebel Cities: Paris, London and New York in the Age of Revolution

    Little, Brown Book Group Rebel Cities: Paris, London and New York in the Age of Revolution

    1 in stock

    London, Paris and New York in the eighteenth century, as today, were places where political authority, commerce and money, art and intellectual life intersected. They straddled an Atlantic world where ships powered by nothing more than wind, currents and human muscle criss-crossed the sea, carrying with them goods, ideas and above all people: men and women, bewigged aristocrats and lawyers, rough-handed craftworkers, quill-wielding bluestockings and doughty fishwives. But the cities were also home to dangerous criminals, corrupt politicians­ - and slaves. Rebel Cities explores the stormy debate about the nature of cities in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries: were they places of enlightenment, sparkling wells of progress and civilisation, or were they dens of vice, degeneracy and disorder? Against a backdrop of accelerating urban expansion and revolution in both Europe and North America, revolutionary burghers of these extraordinary cities expended ink, paint, breath and, sometimes, blood in their struggle to understand, control and master the urban world. Drawing on hundreds of letters, travelogues and eye-witness accounts, Mike Rapport vividly evokes the sights, sounds and smells of these cities, masterfully weaving their history with the politics of revolution. When New Yorkers and Parisians experienced their revolution, when their cities went to war, and when Londoners engaged in political protest, they underwent the whole torrent and exhilaration of human emotions. Determining the character of the cities through their inhabitants, as well as their architecture, topography and the events that shaped them, this magnificent book evokes what it was like for all parts of society to live in London, Paris and New York in one of the most transformative periods in the history of civilisation.

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • On This Day: Facts and trivia for every day of the year

    HarperCollins Publishers On This Day: Facts and trivia for every day of the year

    1 in stock

    Delve into a wealth of famous events, significant sites and momentous births and deaths. Choose a day of the year and discover the fascinating array of people, places and happenings for which it is notable. This day-by-day compendium provides a rich assortment of anniversaries from throughout the centuries and across the world. A day-by-day approach to the key events for each day across the years Uncover little-known historical facts about your own special dates Contains a helpful index arranged by year to help you find those key event anniversaries Previously published as The Times On This Day.

    1 in stock

    £7.99

  • Dynasty: The Rise and Fall of the House of Caesar

    Little, Brown Book Group Dynasty: The Rise and Fall of the House of Caesar

    1 in stock

    'A masterly account of this first wicked century of the Roman Empire' Sunday Times'Holland does not just tell the story of the reign of the Julio-Claudian family. He knits the history of ancient Rome into his narrative - its founding myths, the fall of the republic, the religious superstitions - with a skill so dextrous you don't notice the stitching. Dynasty is both a formidable effort to compile what we can know about the ancient world and a sensational story' Observer'A witty and skilful storyteller... He recounts with pleasure his racy tales of psychopathic cruelty, incest, paedophilia, matricide, fratricide, assassination and depravity' William Dalrymple, New Statesman'A wonderful, surging narrative... [for] anyone interested in history, politics or human nature - and it has never been better told' Mail on SundayTHE TOP TEN SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • All Things Made New: Writings on the Reformation

    Penguin Books Ltd All Things Made New: Writings on the Reformation

    1 in stock

    The Reformation which engulfed England and Europe in the sixteenth century was one of the most highly-charged, bloody and transformative periods in their history, and has remained one of the most contested. In this dazzling book, Diarmaid MacCulloch explores a turbulent and endlessly fascinating era. 'A masterly take on the Reformation ... absorbing and compelling, full of insights' Linda Hogan, Irish Times'One of our very best public historians ... as this collection triumphantly confirms, MacCulloch writes authoritatively and engagingly on a remarkably diverse range of topics in the history of Christian culture' Peter Marshall, Literary Review'Written with elegance and sometimes donnish wit ... he wears his learning lightly' Robert Tombs, The Times'Dazzling ... prodigiously learned ... MacCulloch has a gift for explaining complicated things simply' Jack Scarisbrick, Catholic Herald

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • Empire of the Clouds: The Golden Era of Britain's Aircraft

    Faber & Faber Empire of the Clouds: The Golden Era of Britain's Aircraft

    1 in stock

    In 1945 Britain was the world's leading designer and builder of aircraft - a world-class achievement that was not mere rhetoric. And what aircraft they were. The sleek Comet, the first jet airliner. The awesome delta-winged Vulcan, an intercontinental bomber that could be thrown about the sky like a fighter. The Hawker Hunter, the most beautiful fighter-jet ever built and the Lightning, which could zoom ten miles above the clouds in a couple of minutes and whose pilots rated flying it as better than sex.How did Britain so lose the plot that today there is not a single aircraft manufacturer of any significance in the country? What became of the great industry of de Havilland or Handley Page? And what was it like to be alive in that marvellous post-war moment when innovative new British aircraft made their debut, and pilots were the rock stars of the age?

    1 in stock

    £8.99

  • The Rules of the Game: Jutland and British Naval Command

    Penguin Books Ltd The Rules of the Game: Jutland and British Naval Command

    1 in stock

    Winner of the Longman's History Today Book of the Year Award and the inaugural Westminster Medal for Military Literature More than a century had gone by since the Battle of Trafalgar. Generation after generation of British naval captains had been dreaming ever since of a 'new' Trafalgar - a cataclysmic encounter which would decisively change a war's outcome. At last, in the summer of 1916, they thought their moment had come...Andrew Gordon's extraordinary, gripping book brilliantly recreates the atmosphere of the British navy in the years leading up to Jutland and gives a superb account of the battle itself and its bitterly acrimonious aftermath.

    1 in stock

    £17.09

  • The Little Book of Leicestershire

    The History Press Ltd The Little Book of Leicestershire

    1 in stock

    The Little Book of Leicestershire is a compendium full of information which will make you say, ‘I never knew that!’ Contained within is a plethora of entertaining facts about Leicestershire’s famous and occasionally infamous men and women, its literary, artistic and sporting achievements, customs ancient and modern, transport, battles and ghostly appearances. A reliable reference book and a quirky guide, this can be dipped in to time and time again to reveal something new about the people, the heritage, the secrets and the enduring fascination of the county. A remarkably engaging little book, this is essential reading for visitors and locals alike.

    1 in stock

    £9.99

  • To the Ends of the Earth: How the greatest maps were made

    Quarto Publishing PLC To the Ends of the Earth: How the greatest maps were made

    1 in stock

    This lavishly illustrated book provides a unique insight into the evolution of mapmaking and the science behind it, from the stone age to the digital age. Britain’s leading cartographic author takes us on a historical journey through how the greatest maps were created. Exploring key cartographers and mapmaking methods, as well as fascinating interludes on subjects such as the very first maps, deliberate mistakes, and superlative maps, this comprehensive guide explores how the techniques and technology have developed throughout human history: • Evolving methods of surveying: from the Roman groma, through the naval instruments of the magnetic compass, astrolabes and sextants, to the 20th century revolution of aerial photography • Drawing tools and materials: from Babylonian maps carved in clay, to digital maps created via touchscreen • The introduction of various mapping conventions and key components of a map: from Ptolemy's introduction of longitude and latitude, through the 13th century origins of having north at the top, to the various projections used to represent the Earth. With visually stunning historic maps and antique instruments, this book will engross readers with its fascinating stories of how we came to chart our world.

    1 in stock

    £22.50

  • Pacific: An Ocean of Wonders

    British Library Publishing Pacific: An Ocean of Wonders

    1 in stock

    If you centre a globe on Kiritimati (Christmas Island), all you see around it is a vast expanse of ocean. Islands of various sizes float in view while glimpses of continents encroach on the fringes, but this is a view dominated by water. The immense stretch of the Pacific Ocean is inhabited by a diverse array of peoples and cultures bound by a common thread: their relationship with the sea. The rich history of the Pacific is explored through specific objects, each one beautifully illustrated, from the earliest human engagement with the Pacific through to the modern day. With entries covering mapping, trade, whaling, flora and fauna, and the myriad vessels used to traverse the ocean, Pacific builds on recent interest in the voyages of James Cook to tell a broader history. This visually stunning publication highlights the importance of an ocean that covers very nearly a third of the surface of the globe, and which has dramatically shaped the world and people around it.

    1 in stock

    £27.00

  • The Little Book of the Tudors

    The History Press Ltd The Little Book of the Tudors

    1 in stock

    The five Tudor monarchs – Henry VII, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I – were some of the most influential rulers in British history. This volume explores all aspects of life in the Tudor age, from life at court (and at the grand country estates where Queen Elizabeth paused during her famous ‘progresses’) to the day-to-day activities at the teeming taverns and plague-ridden cities of the Tudor kingdom. With chapters on the people, palaces and pastimes of the age, some amusing secrets of the Tudor medicine cabinet and closet, and stories from some of the most fabulous, eccentric and opulent entertainments of the age, it will delight anyone with an interest in Tudor history – or indeed, in British history as a whole.

    1 in stock

    £11.69

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