Popular Science

55 products


  • Silk: A History in Three Metamorphoses

    HarperCollins Publishers Silk: A History in Three Metamorphoses

    1 in stock

    There is not just one story of silk.In silk is science, history and mythology.In silk is the future. Aarathi Prasad’s Silk is a gorgeous new history weaving together the story of a unique material that has fascinated the world for millennia. Through the scientists who have studied silk, and the biology of the animals from which it has been drawn, Prasad explores the global history, natural history, and future of a unique material that has fascinated the world for millennia. For silk, prized for its lightness, luminosity, and beauty is also one of the strongest biological materials ever known. More than a century ago, it was used to make the first bulletproof vest, and yet science has barely even begun to tap its potential. As the technologies it has inspired – from sutures to pharmaceuticals, replacement body parts to holograms – continue to be developed in laboratories around the world, they are now also beginning to offer a desperately needed, sustainable alternative to the plastics choking our planet. Prasad's Silk is a cultural and biological history from the origins and ancient routes of silk to the biologists who learned the secrets of silk-producing animals, manipulating the habitats and physiologies of moths, spiders and molluscs. Because there is more than one silk, there is more than one story of silk. More than one road, more than one people who discovered it, and wove its threads. From the moths of China, Indonesia and India to the spiders of South America and Madagascar, to the silk-producing molluscs of the Mediterranean, Silk is a book rich in the passionate connections made by women and men of science to the diversity of the animal world. It is an intoxicating mix of biography, intellectual history and science writing that brings to life the human obsession with silk.

    1 in stock

    £19.80

  • How to Grow a Human: Reprogramming Cells and Redesigning Life

    HarperCollins Publishers How to Grow a Human: Reprogramming Cells and Redesigning Life

    1 in stock

    A cutting-edge examination of what it means to be human and to have a 'self' in the face of new scientific developments in genetic editing, cloning and neural downloading. After seeing his own cells used to grow clumps of new neurons – essentially mini-brains – Philip Ball begins to examine the concepts of identity and consciousness. Delving into humanity's deep evolutionary past to look at how complex creatures like us emerged from single-celled life, he offers a new perspective on how humans think about ourselves. In an age when we are increasingly encouraged to regard the 'self' as an abstract sequence of genetic information, or as a pattern of neural activity that might be 'downloaded' to a computer, he return us to the body – to flesh and blood – and anchors a conception of personhood in this unique and ephemeral mortal coil. How to Build a Human brings us back to ourselves – but in doing so, it challenges old preconceptions and values. It asks us to rethink how we exist in the world.

    1 in stock

    £9.99

  • The Aliens Are Coming!: The Exciting and Extraordinary Science Behind Our Search for Life in the Universe

    Little, Brown Book Group The Aliens Are Coming!: The Exciting and Extraordinary Science Behind Our Search for Life in the Universe

    1 in stock

    Discover the fascinating and cutting-edge science behind the greatest question of all: is there life beyond Earth? For millennia, we have looked up at the stars and wondered whether we are alone in the universe. In the last few years, scientists have made huge strides towards answering that question. In The Aliens are Coming!, comedian and bestselling science writer Ben Miller takes us on a fantastic voyage of discovery, from the beginnings of life on earth to the very latest search for alien intelligence. What soon becomes clear is that the hunt for extra-terrestrials is also an exploration of what we actually mean by life. What do you need to kickstart life? How did the teeming energy of the Big Bang end up as frogs, trees and quantity surveyors? How can evolution provide clues about alien life? What might it look like? (Probably not green and sexy, sadly.) As our probes and manned missions venture out into the solar system, and our telescopes image Earth-like planets with ever-increasing accuracy, our search for alien life has never been more exciting - or better funded. The Aliens are Coming! is a comprehensive, accessible and hugely entertaining guide to that search, and our quest to understand the very nature of life itself.

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • Introducing Evolution: A Graphic Guide

    Icon Books Introducing Evolution: A Graphic Guide

    1 in stock

    In 1859, Charles Darwin shocked the world with a radical theory - evolution by natural selection. One hundred and fifty years later, his theory still challenges some of our most precious beliefs.Introducing Evolution provides a step-by-step guide to 'Darwin's dangerous idea' and takes a fresh look at the often misunderstood concepts of natural selection and the selfish gene. Drawing on the latest findings from genetics, ecology and animal behaviour- as well as the work of best-selling science writers such as Richard Dawkins and Steven Pinker- this book reveals how the evidence in favour of evolutionary theory is stronger than ever.

    1 in stock

    £7.19

  • The Science Magpie: Fascinating facts, stories, poems, diagrams and jokes plucked from science

    Icon Books The Science Magpie: Fascinating facts, stories, poems, diagrams and jokes plucked from science

    1 in stock

    From the Large Hadron Collider rap to the sins of Isaac Newton, The Science Magpie is a compelling collection of scientific curiosities.Expand your knowledge as you view the history of the Earth on the face of a clock, tremble at the power of the Richter scale and learn how to measure the speed of light in your kitchen.Skip through time with Darwin's note on the pros and cons of marriage, take part in an 1858 Cambridge exam, meet the African schoolboy with a scientific puzzle named after him and much more.

    1 in stock

    £8.99

  • Numbers: To Infinity and Beyond

    Wooden Books Numbers: To Infinity and Beyond

    1 in stock

    What are numbers? Where do they come from? Are there different kings of number? Why was Pythagoras fascinated by triangular and square numbers? Is there a link between perfect numbers and primes? In this enlightening illustrated pocket book, mathemagician Oliver Linton reveals the wonderful world of numbers, visiting the questions and answers of great number theorists along the way, from Euclid to Euler, Fibonacci to Fermat, and Archimedes to Gauss. No calculator needed! WOODEN BOOKS are small but packed with information. "Fascinating" FINANCIAL TIMES. "Beautiful" LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS. "Rich and Artful" THE LANCET. "Genuinely mind-expanding" FORTEAN TIMES. "Excellent" NEW SCIENTIST. "Stunning" NEW YORK TIMES. Small books, big ideas.

    1 in stock

    £5.99

  • Introducing Genetics: A Graphic Guide

    Icon Books Introducing Genetics: A Graphic Guide

    1 in stock

    Genetics is the newest of all sciences - nothing useful was known about inheritance until just over a century ago. Now genetics is exploding, and before long we will have the complete code, written in three thousand million letters of DNA, of what makes a human being. Introducing Genetics takes us from the early work of Mendel to the discovery of DNA, the human gene map and the treatment of inborn disease. No one can afford to be ignorant of genetics. This book is the perfect introduction.

    1 in stock

    £7.19

  • Introducing Artificial Intelligence: A Graphic Guide

    Icon Books Introducing Artificial Intelligence: A Graphic Guide

    1 in stock

    Artificial Intelligence is no longer the stuff of science fiction.Half a century of research has resulted in machines capable of beating the best human chess players, and humanoid robots which are able to walk and interact with us. But how similar is this 'intelligence' to our own? Can machines really think? Is the mind just a complicated computer program? Addressing major issues in the design of intelligent machines, such as consciousness and environment, and covering everything from the influential groundwork of Alan Turing to the cutting-edge robots of today, Introducing Artificial Intelligence is a uniquely accessible illustrated introduction to this fascinating area of science.

    1 in stock

    £7.19

  • Extraction to Extinction: Rethinking our Relationship with Earth's Natural Resources

    Saraband Extraction to Extinction: Rethinking our Relationship with Earth's Natural Resources

    1 in stock

    Everything we use started life in the earth, as a rock or a mineral vein, a layer of an ancient seabed, or the remains of a long-extinct volcano. Humanity’s ability to fashion nature to its own ends is by no means a new phenomenon. Silica-rich rocks have been flint-knapped by Stone Age people, transformed into stained glass in medieval times, and made into silicon chips for computers in the Digital Age. Our trick of turning rocks rich in malachite and chalcopyrite into copper has taken us from Bronze Age Minoan vases to the wiring that powers modern-day machinery. Today, we mine, quarry, pump, cut, blast and crush the Earth’s resources at an unprecedented rate. We shift many times more rock, soil and sediment each year than the world’s rivers and glaciers, wind and rain combined. Plastics alone now weigh twice as much as all the marine and terrestrial animals around the globe. We have become a dominant, even dangerous, force on the planet. In EXTRACTION TO EXTINCTION, David Howe traces our environmental impact through time to unearth how our obsession with endlessly producing and throwing away more and more stuff has pushed the planet to its limit. And he considers the question: what does the future look like for our depleted world?

    1 in stock

    £9.99

  • Introducing Darwin: A Graphic Guide

    Icon Books Introducing Darwin: A Graphic Guide

    1 in stock

    Progress in genetics today would not be possible without Darwin's revolution, but the mysterious man who laid the rational basis for undermining belief in God's creation was remarkable timid. He spent most of his life in seclusion; a semi-invalid, riddled with doubts, fearing the controversy his theories might unleash.In this brilliantly lucid book - a classic originally published in 1982 - Jonathan Miller unravels Darwin's life and his contribution to biology, and traces the path from his scientific predecessors to the later modifications that his own evolutionary theories required.Introducing Darwin brings alive the difficult progress from pre-Darwinian thinking to modern genetics and the devastatingly important impact of one man on our fundamental understanding of biology, life and ourselves.

    1 in stock

    £7.19

  • Introducing Stephen Hawking: A Graphic Guide

    Icon Books Introducing Stephen Hawking: A Graphic Guide

    1 in stock

    'An ideal introduction [to Stephen Hawking]' - Independent 'Astonishingly comprehensive - clearer than Hawking himself' - Focus Stephen Hawking was a world-famous physicist with a cameo in The Simpsons on his CV, but outside of his academic field his work was little understood. To the public he was a tragic figure - a brilliant scientist and author of the 9 million-copy-selling A Brief History of Time, and yet spent the majority of his life confined to a wheelchair and almost completely paralysed. Hawking's major contribution to science was to integrate the two great theories of 20th-century physics: Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. J.P. McEvoy and Oscar Zarate's brilliant graphic guide explores Hawking's life, the evolution of his work from his days as a student, and his breathtaking discoveries about where these fundamental laws break down or overlap, such as on the edge of a Black Hole or at the origin of the Universe itself.

    1 in stock

    £7.19

  • Ten Trips: The New Reality of Psychedelics

    Vintage Publishing Ten Trips: The New Reality of Psychedelics

    1 in stock

    Neuropsychologist Andy Mitchell punctures the hype around psychedelic drugs while providing the fullest picture yet of their limitlessly fascinating possibilities.'Original and thrilling ... achieving profound insights' Mike Jay, author of Psychonauts'An incisive, deeply personal and beautifully written account of the power, the uses and the modern misuses of psychedelics. Highly recommended' Anil Seth, author of Being YouPsychedelics have made a comeback but remain a mystery. They are now a 'breakthrough therapy' for mental illness but in truth we have only a vague idea how they work and there is a limit to what the science can reveal. To have any hope of understanding them, we must broaden our view - dramatically - of what they actually are.In this daring, perception-shifting odyssey, clinical neuropsychologist Andy Mitchell takes ten different drugs in ten different settings, journeying from a London neuroimaging lab to the Colombian Amazon via Silicon Valley and his friend's basement kitchen. His encounters with scientists and gangsters, venture capitalists and con men, psychonauts and shamans, as well as with the drugs themselves, reveal the reality of psychedelics in all their strangeness, hilarity, darkness and wonder.'A hair-raising hurtle of a ride' Henry Shukman, author of One Blade of Grass'Utterly compelling ... like having an out of body experience' Mark Miodownik, author of Stuff Matters'The psychedelic world has been waiting for this book' Professor Erika Dyck

    1 in stock

    £19.80

  • The End of Bias: Can We Change Our Minds?

    Granta Books The End of Bias: Can We Change Our Minds?

    1 in stock

    Shortlisted for the Royal Society Science Book Prize Bias affects us all, every day of our lives. It shapes how we see each other, and how we are seen in turn. It fuels discrimination on the basis of sex, gender, race, age, class and appearance. It robs organizations of talent, science of breakthroughs, politics of insight, individuals of their future and communities of justice. But what if bias is a habit that we can overcome? "Despite revolutions in our understanding of bias, we're still much better at documenting the problem than solving it. When it comes to prevention and cure, Jessica Nordell's powerful book is a breakthrough. With state-of-the-art science and gripping narratives, she reveals steps what individuals, groups, and institutions can take to fight prejudice" - Adam Grant, author of Think Again

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • Alchemist's Kitchen: Extraordinary Potions and Curious Notions

    Wooden Books Alchemist's Kitchen: Extraordinary Potions and Curious Notions

    1 in stock

    What is the secret meaning of alchemical symbolism? Why was the Royal Art kept secret for so long? Could ancient images really turn molten lead into gold with a mere pinch of the Philosopher's Stone? Really? Alchemy is perhaps the last true magical art to survive the ravages of the modern world. In this exquisite book, top laboratory alchemist Guy Ogilvy initiates the reader into some of the key concepts and practices of this extraordinary field of study. It includes extensive appendices. WOODEN BOOKS are small but packed with information. "Fascinating" FINANCIAL TIMES. "Beautiful" LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS. "Rich and Artful" THE LANCET. "Genuinely mind-expanding" FORTEAN TIMES. "Excellent" NEW SCIENTIST. "Stunning" NEW YORK TIMES. Small books, big ideas.

    1 in stock

    £5.99

  • The Britannica Guide to Genetics: The Most Exciting Development in Life Science - from Mendel to the Human Genome Project

    Little, Brown Book Group The Britannica Guide to Genetics: The Most Exciting Development in Life Science - from Mendel to the Human Genome Project

    1 in stock

    The Britannica Guide to Genetics is the ideal companion for students or general popular science readers who wish to know the facts behind the latest research and discoveries.After the Introduction from bestselling science writer and geneticist Steve Jones the book covers the entire history of genetics from Gregor Mendel's first experiments with peas at the end of the nineteenth century to the announcement of the Human Genome Project in 1998.Throughout the twentieth century new discoveries about the qualities of our genes have been heralded as essential leaps of progress in modern science forcing us to ask how much do our genes determine our personalities? What makes us different from other species? But as we enter the twenty-first century and we have begun to manipulate genes and the genome the questions have changed.

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • A Brief History of the Universe: From Ancient Babylon to the Big Bang

    Little, Brown Book Group A Brief History of the Universe: From Ancient Babylon to the Big Bang

    1 in stock

    Since the dawn of humanity, men have attempted to divine the nature of the heavens. The first astronomers mapped the movement of the seasons and used the positions of the constellations for augurs and astrology. Today, the search goes ever deeper into the nature of reality and life itself. In this accessible overview, astrophysicist J.P. McEvoy tells the story of how our knowledge of the cosmos has developed. He puts in context many of the greatest discoveries of all time and many of the dominant personalities: Aristotle, Copernicus, and Isaac Newton, and as we approach the modern era, Einstein, Eddington, and Hawking.

    1 in stock

    £8.09

  • Turn Me On

    Gibbs M. Smith Inc Turn Me On

    1 in stock

    1 in stock

    £7.19

  • Sentient: What Animals Reveal About Human Senses

    Pan Macmillan Sentient: What Animals Reveal About Human Senses

    1 in stock

    In Sentient, Jackie Higgins assembles a menagerie of zoological creatures – from land, air, sea and all four corners of the globe – to understand what it means to be human.'Spellbinding . . . More than any other book, [Sentient] has made me think differently about the world this year.' – Financial Times Best Books of the YearThe peacock mantis shrimp can throw a punch that can fracture aquarium walls.The great grey owl can hear many decibels lower than the human ear.The star-nosed mole’s miraculous nose allows it to catch worms in as little as 120 milliseconds.In Sentient we also meet the four-eyed spookfish and its dark vision, the vampire bat and its remarkable powers of touch, as well as the common octopus, the Goliath catfish and the duck-billed platypus. Each zoological marvel illustrates the surprising sensory powers that lie within us and enables us to engage with the world in ways we never knew possible.'Lyrical and lucid . . . Higgins makes popular science accessible.' – Observer

    1 in stock

    £9.99

  • The Big Bang of Numbers: How to Build the Universe Using Only Maths

    Bloomsbury Publishing PLC The Big Bang of Numbers: How to Build the Universe Using Only Maths

    1 in stock

    'Who knew numbers could be so charming? ... Suri takes us on a light-hearted journey all the way from nothing (zero) to infinity' Karen Joy Fowler, New York Times bestselling author of We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves Our universe has multiple origin stories, from religious creation myths to the Big Bang of scientists. But if we leave those behind and start from nothing – no matter, no cosmos, not even empty space – could we create a universe using only maths? In this new mathematical origin story, mathematician and award-winning novelist Manil Suri creates a natural progression of ideas needed to design our world, starting with numbers and continuing through geometry, algebra, and beyond. With evocative and engaging examples ranging from multidimensional crochet to the Mona Lisa’s asymmetrical smile, as well as ingenious storytelling that helps illuminate complex concepts like infinity and relativity, The Big Bang of Numbers charts a playful, inventive course to existence. Distilled from almost four decades of teaching experience, and offering both striking new perspectives for maths aficionados and an accessible introduction for enthusiastic novices, The Big Bang of Numbers proves that we can all fall in love with maths.

    1 in stock

    £12.99

  • The Science of Sherlock: The Forensic Facts Behind the Fiction

    Skyhorse Publishing The Science of Sherlock: The Forensic Facts Behind the Fiction

    1 in stock

    An essential read for the legions of Sherlockians about the globe. Sherlock Holmes is the world’s greatest-ever consulting detective. The huge popularity of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s fictional creation, and his sixty stories, made Sherlock one of the most famous characters of Victorian London. All evidence suggests Sherlock’s fan adoration has lasted almost one and a half centuries through many adaptations. There is Sherlock fan fiction in China, Sherlock manga in Japan, and tribute pop songs in Korea. Guinness World Records awarded Sherlock Holmes the title of most portrayed literary human character in film and television thanks to the popular Sherlock Holmes movies starring Robert Downey Jr., series like Elementary starring Lucy Liu, Sherlock starring Benedict Cumberbatch, and so many more. Sherlock’s enduring appeal shows that his detective talents are as compelling today as they were in the days of Conan Doyle. The Science of Sherlock gives you an in-depth look at the science behind the cases Sherlock cracked in those Ripper streets of old.

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • Mending the Mind: The Art and Science of Overcoming Clinical Depression

    Orion Publishing Co Mending the Mind: The Art and Science of Overcoming Clinical Depression

    1 in stock

    'A tour de force . . . an important, affecting and effective book' ALASTAIR CAMPBELL'[A] gorgeous and urgent book' STEVEN PINKER'Reminds us that, despite our hazy understanding of depression, and despite the true horror of the illness, some hope for recovery remains' THE TIMES'Extremely intelligent, compassionate and well-written' EVENING STANDARDSadness is an inevitable part of life, but for most of us it coexists with happiness. Clinical depression, however, unhinges us from everything we know about the world and makes us strangers to those we love. It is the predominant mental-health problem worldwide, affecting more than 250 million people. Yet how much do we really know about the condition and how to treat it? Drawing on his own experience of a disorder that has afflicted humanity throughout history, Oliver Kamm charts the progress of science in understanding depression and explores insights from writers and artists through the ages. Hopeful, revelatory and deeply versed in current research, Mending the Mind sets out in plain language how clinical depression can be countered - and may eventually be overcome.

    1 in stock

    £9.99

  • The Mice Who Sing For Sex: And Other Weird Tales from the World of Science

    Little, Brown Book Group The Mice Who Sing For Sex: And Other Weird Tales from the World of Science

    1 in stock

    Lliana Bird and Dr Jack Lewis tackle the strange and surreal phenomena from the depths of the oceans to the limits of the far flung universe; the dark corners of your laundry basket to the forgotten compartments of your fridge. Packed with unusual facts and stories of the absurd each of the fascinating insights is told with the Geek Chic team's inimitable humour and wit.An hilarious exploration all things bizarre from the world of science, The Mice Who Sing for Sex takes on weighty issues including heavy metal loving sharks, life-threatening skinny jeans, our impending jellyfish apocalypse and of course, the singing mice of the title.

    1 in stock

    £11.69

  • No Need for Geniuses: Revolutionary Science in the Age of the Guillotine

    Little, Brown Book Group No Need for Geniuses: Revolutionary Science in the Age of the Guillotine

    1 in stock

    Paris at the time of the French Revolution was the world capital of science. Its scholars laid the foundations of today's physics, chemistry and biology. They were true revolutionaries: agents of an upheaval both of understanding and of politics. Many had an astonishing breadth of talents. The Minister of Finance just before the upheaval did research on crystals and the spread of animal disease. After it, Paris's first mayor was an astronomer, the general who fought off invaders was a mathematician while Marat, a major figure in the Terror, saw himself as a leading physicist. Paris in the century around 1789 saw the first lightning conductor, the first flight, the first estimate of the speed of light and the invention of the tin can and the stethoscope. The metre replaced the yard and the theory of evolution came into being. The city was saturated in science and many of its monuments still are. The Eiffel Tower, built to celebrate the Revolution's centennial, saw the world's first wind-tunnel and first radio message, and first observation of cosmic rays.Perhaps the greatest Revolutionary scientist of all, Antoine Lavoisier, founded modern chemistry and physiology, transformed French farming, and much improved gunpowder manufacture. His political activities brought him a fortune, but in the end led to his execution. The judge who sentenced him - and many other researchers - claimed that 'the Revolution has no need for geniuses'. In this enthralling and timely book Steve Jones shows how wrong this was and takes a sideways look at Paris, its history, and its science, to give a dazzling new insight into the City of Light.

    1 in stock

    £13.49

  • Talking to Robots: A Brief Guide to Our Human-Robot Futures

    Little, Brown Book Group Talking to Robots: A Brief Guide to Our Human-Robot Futures

    1 in stock

    What robot and AI systems are being built and imagined right now? What do they say about us, their creators? Will they usher in a fantastic new future, or destroy us? What do some of our greatest thinkers, from physicist Brian Greene and futurist Kevin Kelly to inventor Dean Kamen, geneticist George Church, and filmmaker Tiffany Shlain, anticipate for our human-robot future? For even as robots and AI intrigue us and make us anxious about the future, our fascination with robots has always been about more than the potential of the technology - it's also about what robots tell us about being human.From present-day Facebook and Amazon bots to near-future 'intimacy' bots and 'the robot that stole my job' bots, bestselling American popular science writer David Ewing Duncan's TALKING TO ROBOTS is a wonderfully entertaining and insightful guide to possible future scenarios about robots, both real and imagined. These scenarios are informed by interviews with actual engineers, scientists, artists, philosophers, futurists and others, who share with us their ideas, hopes and fears about robots. In the future, we will all remember when the robots truly arrived. Perhaps a robot surgeon saved your child's life, or maybe your inaugural robot moment will be more banal, when you realised with relief that the machines had taken over all the tasks you used to hate - taking out the rubbish, changing nappies, paying bills . . . Perhaps your recollection will be less benign, a memory of when a robot turned against you: the robot that threatened to seize your assets over a tax dispute. You might also remember when the robots began campaigning for equal rights with humans, and for an end to robot slavery, abuse and exploitation. Or when robots became so smart that they became our benign overlords, treating us like cute and not very bright pets. Or when the robots grew tired of us and decided to destroy us, turning our own robo-powered weapons of mass destruction against us. Further into the future we will remember when robots became organic, created in a lab from living tissue to look and be just like us, only better and more resilient. Even further in the future, we will recall when we first had the option of becoming robots ourselves, by downloading our minds into organic-engineered beings that could theoretically live forever. And yet . . . will we feel that something is missing as the millennia pass? Will we grow weary of being robots, invulnerable and immortal? Mostly we love our technology as it whisks us across and over continents and oceans at 35,000 feet, or summons us rides in someone else's Prius or connects us online to long-lost friends. Yet deep down, many of us fe

    1 in stock

    £13.49

  • The Reality Frame: Relativity and our place in the universe

    Icon Books The Reality Frame: Relativity and our place in the universe

    1 in stock

    Weaving together the great ideas of science, The Reality Frame takes us on a thrilling journey from empty space all the way to the human mind.Acclaimed science writer Brian Clegg builds up reality piece by piece, from space, to time, to matter, movement, the fundamental forces, life, and the massive transformation that life itself has wrought on the natural world. He reveals that underlying it all is not, as we might believe, a system of immovable absolutes, but the ever-shifting, amorphous world of relativity.From religion to philosophy, humanity has traditionally sought out absolutes to explain the world around us, but as science has developed, relativity has swept away many of these certainties, leaving only a handful of unchangeable essentials - such as absolute zero, nothingness, light - leading to better science and a new understanding of the essence of being human.This is an Ascent of Man for the 21st century, the gripping story of modern science that will fill you with wonder and give you a new insight into our place in the universe.

    1 in stock

    £18.00

  • The Consolations of Physics: Why the Wonders of the Universe Can Make You Happy

    Hodder & Stoughton The Consolations of Physics: Why the Wonders of the Universe Can Make You Happy

    1 in stock

    'A beautifully crafted love letter to physics.' Nature'A book more about life and passion than physics. People who have never cared a jot about physics (like me) must read this book.' SUZANNE O'SULLIVANThe Consolations of Physics is an eloquent manifesto for physics. In an age where uncertainty and division is rife, Tim Radford, science editor of the Guardian for twenty-five years, turns to the wonders of the universe for consolation. 'A beautiful, inspiring reflection on science, humanity, space, and matter.' SARAH BAKEWELLFrom the launch of the Voyager spacecraft and how it furthered our understanding of planets, stars and galaxies to the planet composed entirely of diamond and graphite and the sound of a blacksmith's anvil; from the hole NASA drilled in the heavens to the discovery of the Higgs Boson and the endeavours to prove the Big Bang, The Consolations of Physics will guide you from a tiny particle to the marvels of outer space.

    1 in stock

    £8.09

  • A Cure for Darkness: The story of depression and how we treat it

    Ebury Publishing A Cure for Darkness: The story of depression and how we treat it

    1 in stock

    'Boldly ambitious, deeply affecting, and magisterial in scope' Steve Silberman, author of Neurotribes'Expansive and thoughtful, it illuminates the complexity and elusiveness of his subject' New StatesmanDepression is a leading cause of disability around the world today, a growing health crisis that affects us all. It is a complex and diverse condition. But it is also highly treatable.In this profound and sweeping history, Alex Riley charts the macabre, ingenious, and often surprising developments in the science of mental healthcare over the last 2000 years. In the pursuit to understand his own experiences with mental illness, Riley interweaves his own family history with fascinating stories of biological and psychological treatments which illuminate the past, question the current state of diagnosis, and investigate the hype and hopes for future treatments.From the re-emergence of long-forgotten therapies to a group of grandmothers who stand at the forefront of a revolution in mental healthcare, A Cure for Darkness is an essential exploration of one of the most pressing problems of our time.

    1 in stock

    £10.99

  • Dark and Magical Places: The Neuroscience of How We Navigate

    Profile Books Ltd Dark and Magical Places: The Neuroscience of How We Navigate

    1 in stock

    "A NATURAL STORYTELLER" Mary Roach "BRILLIANT AND BEGUILING" Matthew Gavin Frank "CAPTIVATING ... WILL ALTER THE WAY YOU SEE AND MOVE THROUGH THE WORLD" M. R. O'Connor "AS ENTERTAINING AS IT IS ENLIGHTENING" Geographical Magazine, Book of the Month Within our heads, we carry around an infinite and endlessly unfolding map of the world. Navigation is one of the most ancient neural abilities we have - older even than language - and in Dark and Magical Places, Christopher Kemp embarks on a journey to discover the remarkable extent of what our minds can do. From the secrets of supernavigators to the strange, dreamlike environments inhabited by people with 'place blindness', he will explore the myriad ways in which we find our way. Kemp explains the cutting-edge neuroscience that is transforming our understanding of it - and tries to answer why, for a species with a highly-sophisticated internal navigation system that evolved over millions of years, do humans get lost such a lot? "I WAS THRILLED TO DISCOVER THIS BOOK" Robert Moor

    1 in stock

    £15.29

  • A Brief History of Black Holes: And why nearly everything you know about them is wrong

    Pan Macmillan A Brief History of Black Holes: And why nearly everything you know about them is wrong

    1 in stock

    In A Brief History of Black Holes, award-winning University of Oxford researcher Dr Becky Smethurst charts five hundred years of scientific breakthroughs in astronomy and astrophysics.'A jaunt through space history . . . with charming wit and many pop-culture references' – BBC Sky At Night Magazine Right now, you are orbiting a black hole.The Earth orbits the Sun, and the Sun orbits the centre of the Milky Way: a supermassive black hole, the strangest and most misunderstood phenomenon in the galaxy.In this cosmic tale of discovery, Dr Becky Smethurst takes us from the earliest observations of the universe and the collapse of massive stars, to the iconic first photographs of a black hole and her own published findings.She explains why black holes aren’t really ‘black’, that you never ever want to be ‘spaghettified’, how black holes are more like sofa cushions than hoovers and why, beyond the event horizon, the future is a direction in space rather than in time.Told with humour and wisdom, this captivating book describes the secrets behind the most profound questions about our universe – all hidden inside black holes.

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • Becoming Wild: How Animals Learn to be Animals

    Oneworld Publications Becoming Wild: How Animals Learn to be Animals

    1 in stock

    A New York Times Notable Book of 2020 ‘Bracing and enlightening’ Science Culture is something exclusive to human beings, isn’t it? Not so, says intrepid researcher Carl Safina. Becoming Wild reveals the rich cultures that survive in some of Earth’s remaining wild places. By showing how sperm whales, scarlet macaws and chimpanzees teach and learn, Safina offers a fresh understanding of what is constantly going on beyond humanity, and how we’re all connected. ‘Becoming Wild demands that we wake up’ Telegraph

    1 in stock

    £10.99

  • Emotional Ignorance: Lost and found in the science of emotion

    Guardian Faber Publishing Emotional Ignorance: Lost and found in the science of emotion

    1 in stock

    Recommended by the New Scientist.'Brilliant.' Stylist, 'Ten new books to bring you comfort and wisdom in 2023''Thoughtful and thought-provoking - you need to read this book' - Gina Rippon'An affecting and illuminating book for anyone who has feelings, and who wants to know why.' - Katie Mack'The master of understated humour.' BBC Radio ScotlandWhy can't we think straight when hungry? What's the point of nightmares? And why is it so impossible to forget embarrassing memories?Emotions can be a pain. After losing his dad to Covid-19, Dean Burnett found himself wondering what life would be like without them. And so, he decided to put his feelings under the microscope - for science.In Emotional Ignorance, Dean takes us on an incredible journey of discovery, stretching from the origins of life to the end of the universe. Along the way he reveals:- why we would ever follow our gut;- whether things really were better in the old days;- why doomscrolling is so addictive;- and how sad music can make us happier.Combining expert analysis, brilliant humour and powerful insights into the grieving process, Dean uncovers how, far from holding us back, our emotions make us who we are.

    1 in stock

    £13.49

  • Silent Earth: THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER

    Vintage Publishing Silent Earth: THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER

    1 in stock

    THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER'Read this book, then look and wonder' Sunday Times *A TLS Book of the Year*We have to learn to live as part of nature, not apart from it. And the first step is to start looking after the insects, the little creatures that make our shared world go round.Insects are essential for life as we know it - without them, our world would look vastly different. Drawing on the latest ground-breaking research and a lifetime's study, Dave Goulson reveals the long decline of insect populations that has taken place in recent decades and its potential consequences.Eye-opening and inspiring, Silent Earth asks for profound change at every level and a passionate argument or us to love, respect and care for our six-legged friends.'Compelling - Silent Earth is a wake-up call' Isabella Tree, author of Wilding'Enlightening, urgent and funny, Goulson's book is a timely call for action' New Statesman

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • First Light: Switching on Stars at the Dawn of Time

    Bloomsbury Publishing PLC First Light: Switching on Stars at the Dawn of Time

    1 in stock

    Opens a window into a previously dark and secret time in our universe's history: when the first stars were born. Astronomers have successfully observed a great deal of the Universe’s history, from recording the afterglow of the Big Bang to imaging thousands of galaxies, and even to visualising an actual black hole. There’s a lot for astronomers to be smug about. But when it comes to understanding how the Universe began and grew up, we are literally in the dark ages. In effect, we are missing the first one billion years from the timeline of the Universe. This brief but far-reaching period in the Universe’s history, known to astrophysicists as the ‘Epoch of Reionisation’, represents the start of the cosmos as we experience it today. The time when the very first stars burst into life, when darkness gave way to light. After hundreds of millions of years of dark, uneventful expansion, one by the one these stars suddenly came into being. This was the point at which the chaos of the Big Bang first began to yield to the order of galaxies, black holes and stars, kick-starting the pathway to planets, to comets, to moons, and to life itself. Incorporating the very latest research into this branch of astrophysics, this book sheds light on this time of darkness, telling the story of these first stars, hundreds of times the size of the Sun and a million times brighter, lonely giants that lived fast and died young in powerful explosions that seeded the Universe with the heavy elements that we are made of. Dr Emma Chapman tells us how these stars formed, why they were so unusual, and what they can teach us about the Universe today. She also offers a first-hand look at the immense telescopes about to come on line to peer into the past, searching for the echoes and footprints of these stars, to take this period in the Universe’s history from the realm of theoretical physics towards the wonder of observational astronomy.

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • Written in Stone (Icon Science)

    Icon Books Written in Stone (Icon Science)

    1 in stock

    Darwin's theory of evolution was for more than a century dogged by a major problem: the evidence proving the connections between the main groups of organisms was nowhere to be found.By the 1970s this absence of 'transitional fossils' was hotly debated; some palaeontologists wondered if these 'missing links' had been so quick that no trace of them was left. However, during the past three decades fossils of walking whales from Pakistan, feathered dinosaurs from China, fish with feet from the Arctic Circle, ape-like humans from Africa, and many more bizarre creatures that fill in crucial gaps in our understanding of evolution have all been unearthed.The first account of the hunt for evolution's 'missing links', Written in Stone shows how these discoveries have revolutionised palaeontology, and explores what its findings might mean for our place on earth.

    1 in stock

    £8.09

  • Instant Science: Key thinkers, theories, discoveries and concepts explained on a single page

    Welbeck Publishing Group Instant Science: Key thinkers, theories, discoveries and concepts explained on a single page

    1 in stock

    Instant Science pulls together all the pivotal scientific knowledge and thought into one concise volume. Each page contains a discrete 'cheat sheet', which tells you the most important facts in bite-sized chunks, meaning you can become an expert in an instant. From Copernicus to Curie, gravity to climate change, atom bombs to the International Space Station, every key figure, discovery or invention is explained with succinct and lively text and graphics. Perfect for the knowledge hungry and time poor, this collection of graphic-led lessons makes science interesting and accessible. Everything you need to know is here.

    1 in stock

    £13.49

  • Big Data: How the Information Revolution Is Transforming Our Lives

    Icon Books Big Data: How the Information Revolution Is Transforming Our Lives

    1 in stock

    Is the Brexit vote successful big data politics or the end of democracy? Why do airlines overbook, and why do banks get it wrong so often? How does big data enable Netflix to forecast a hit, CERN to find the Higgs boson and medics to discover if red wine really is good for you? And how are companies using big data to benefit from smart meters, use advertising that spies on you and develop the gig economy, where workers are managed by the whim of an algorithm?The volumes of data we now access can give unparalleled abilities to make predictions, respond to customer demand and solve problems. But Big Brother's shadow hovers over it. Though big data can set us free and enhance our lives, it has the potential to create an underclass and a totalitarian state. With big data ever-present, you can't afford to ignore it. Acclaimed science writer Brian Clegg - a habitual early adopter of new technology (and the owner of the second-ever copy of Windows in the UK) - brings big data to life.

    1 in stock

    £8.09

  • Turing and the Universal Machine (Icon Science): The Making of the Modern Computer

    Icon Books Turing and the Universal Machine (Icon Science): The Making of the Modern Computer

    1 in stock

    The history of the computer is entwinedwith that of the modern world and with the life of one man, the brilliant buttroubled Alan Turing.How did the computer come to structureand dominate our lives so totally? In Jon Agar's enlightening story of the'universal machine', we discover how Turing's groundbreaking work not onlyhelped break German codes during the Second World War but also founded the beginningsof the modern computer.Persecuted by the authorities for hishomosexuality, and ultimately hounded to suicide, Turing's personaltribulations are as relevant to the modern world as his work on computing, asindicated by his posthumous royal pardon of 2013 and the recent film The Imitation Game, which focuses onTuring's turbulent life.

    1 in stock

    £8.09

  • The Reality Frame: Relativity and our place in the universe

    Icon Books The Reality Frame: Relativity and our place in the universe

    1 in stock

    Weaving together the great ideas of science, in this, his magnum opus, Brian Clegg builds up reality piece by piece, from space, to time, to matter, movement, the fundamental forces, life, and the massive transformation that life itself has wrought on the natural world. He reveals that underlying it all is not, as we might believe, a system of immovable absolutes, but the ever-shifting, amorphous world of relativity.From religion to philosophy, humanity has traditionally sought out absolutes to explain the world around us, but as science has developed, relativity has swept away many of these certainties, leaving only a handful of unchangeable essentials - such as absolute zero, nothingness, light - leading to better science and a new understanding of the essence of being human.This is an Ascent of Man for the 21st century, the gripping story of modern science that will fill you with wonder and give you a new insight into our place in the universe.

    1 in stock

    £8.99

  • Stranger in the Mirror: The Scientific Search for the Self

    Little, Brown Book Group Stranger in the Mirror: The Scientific Search for the Self

    1 in stock

    Who are we? Where is the boundary between us and everything else? Are we all multiple personalities? And how can we control who we become?From distinguished psychologist Robert Levine comes this provocative and entertaining scientific exploration of the most personal and important of all landscapes: the physical and psychological entity we call our self. Using a combination of case studies and cutting-edge research in psychology, biology, neuroscience, virtual reality and many other fields, Levine challenges cherished beliefs about the unity and stability of the self - but also suggests that we are more capable of change than we know. Transformation, Levine shows, is the human condition at virtually every level. Physically, our cells are unrecognizable from one moment to the next. Cognitively, our self-perceptions are equally changeable: A single glitch can make us lose track of a body part or our entire body, or to confuse our very self with that of another person. Psychologically, we switch back and forth like quicksilver between incongruent, sometimes adversarial sub-selves. Socially, we appear to be little more than an ever-changing troupe of actors. And, culturally, the boundaries of the self vary wildly around the world - from the confines of one's body to an entire village. The self, in short, is a fiction: vague, arbitrary, and utterly intangible. But it is also interminably fluid. And this unleashes a world of potential. Engaging, informative, and ultimately liberating, Stranger in the Mirror will change forever how you think about your self - and what you might become.

    1 in stock

    £13.49

  • Hacking the Code of Life: How gene editing will rewrite our futures

    Icon Books Hacking the Code of Life: How gene editing will rewrite our futures

    1 in stock

    'An excellent, brisk guide to what is likely to happen as opposed to the fantastically remote.' - Los Angeles Review of BooksIn 2018 the world woke up to gene editing with a storm of controversy over twin girls born in China with genetic changes deliberately introduced by scientists - changes they will pass on to their own offspring. Genetic modification (GM) has been with us for 45 years now, but the new system known as CRISPR or gene editing can manipulate the genes of almost any organism with a degree of precision, ease and speed that we could only dream of ten years ago. But is it ethical to change the genetic material of organisms in a way that might be passed on to future generations? If a person is suffering from a lethal genetic disease, is it unethical to deny them this option? Who controls the application of this technology, when it makes 'biohacking' - perhaps of one's own genome - a real possibility?Nessa Carey's book is a thrilling and timely snapshot of a cutting-edge technology that will radically alter our futures and the way we prevent disease.'A focused snapshot of a brave new world.' - Nature 'A brisk, accessible primer on the fast-moving field, a clear-eyed look at a technology that is already driving major scientific advances - and raising complex ethical questions.' - Emily Anthes, Undark

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • What Do You Think You Are?: The Science of What Makes You You

    Icon Books What Do You Think You Are?: The Science of What Makes You You

    1 in stock

    'Gets right to the heart of what makes us what we are. Read it!' Angela Saini, author of Inferior and Superior: The Return of Race ScienceThe popular science equivalent of Who Do You Think You Are? Popular science master Brian Clegg's new book is an entertaining tour through the science of what makes you you.From the atomic level, through life and energy to genetics and personality, it explores how the billions of particles which make up you - your DNA, your skin, your memories - have come to be.It starts with the present-day reader and follows a number of trails to discover their origins: how the atoms in your body were created and how they got to you in space and time, the sources of things you consume, how the living cells of your body developed, where your massive brain and consciousness originated, how human beings evolved and, ultimately, what your personal genetic history reveals.

    1 in stock

    £8.99

  • Quantum Computing: The Transformative Technology of the Qubit Revolution

    Icon Books Quantum Computing: The Transformative Technology of the Qubit Revolution

    1 in stock

    The ultimate non-technical guide to the fast-developing world of quantum computing Computer technology has improved exponentially over the last 50 years. But the headroom for bigger and better electronic solutions is running out. Our best hope is to engage the power of quantum physics. 'Quantum algorithms' had already been written long before hardware was built. These would enable, for example, a quantum computer to exponentially speed up an information search, or to crack the mathematical trick behind internet security. However, making a quantum computer is incredibly difficult. Despite hundreds of laboratories around the world working on them, we are only just seeing them come close to 'supremacy' where they can outperform a traditional computer. In this approachable introduction, Brian Clegg explains algorithms and their quantum counterparts, explores the physical building blocks and quantum weirdness necessary to make a quantum computer, and uncovers the capabilities of the current generation of machines.

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • The Good Virus: The Untold Story of Phages: The Most Abundant Life Forms on Earth and What They Can Do For Us

    Hodder & Stoughton The Good Virus: The Untold Story of Phages: The Most Abundant Life Forms on Earth and What They Can Do For Us

    1 in stock

    CHOSEN AS A BOOK OF THE YEAR 2023 BY WATERSTONES AND THE TIMES'The book that might change the world ... This is luxury-class science writing'TELEGRAPH'One of the best books of any genre that I've read in 2023, this superbly-written book ... will fascinate absolutely everyone.'FORBES'A delight. To learn more about phages is to discover fascinating details about a hidden world'NATURE'Outstanding'CLIVE MYRIE__________Not all viruses are out to get us - in fact, the viruses that do us harm are vastly outnumbered by viruses that can actually save lives.At every moment, within your body and all around you, trillions of microscopic combatants are fighting an invisible war. Countless times per second, 'good' viruses known as phages are infecting and destroying bacteria. These phages are the most abundant life form on the planet and have an incredible power to heal rather than harm. So why have most of us never even heard of them?The Good Virus reveals how personalities, power and politics have repeatedly crashed together to hinder our understanding of these weird and wonderful life forms. We explore why Stalin's Soviet Union embraced using phages to fight disease but the rest of the world shunned the idea. We find out why scientists only recently realised phages are central to all ecosystems on Earth. And we meet the often eccentric phage heroes who have shaped the strange history of this field and are unlocking its exciting future.Faced with the threat of antibiotic resistance, we need phages now more than ever. The Good Virus celebrates what phages could do for us and our planet if they are at last given the attention they deserve.

    1 in stock

    £22.50

  • Short Cuts: Science: Navigate Your Way Through Big Ideas

    Icon Books Short Cuts: Science: Navigate Your Way Through Big Ideas

    1 in stock

    A LAUNCH TITLE FOR ICON BOOKS' BRAND-NEW SHORT CUTS SERIESWhat with accelerating particles and gravitational waves, dark matter and light speed, nanoscales and exoplanets, the landscape of today's science is an amazing place to explore. But how are you expected to navigate this rapidly spinning world?Short Cuts: Science provides the map you need to start exploring seriously big ideas. Fifty quickfire questions lead to 'short cut' answers written by experts in their field, with each one the setting-off point for clear directions to help you plot your route through an essential concept.With one-stop graphics presenting a memorable image for each idea, and route-map glossaries explaining key words and their connections, Short Cuts: Science will guide you through a world of intellectual wonders.

    1 in stock

    £13.49

  • Weirdest Maths: At the Frontiers of Reason

    Oneworld Publications Weirdest Maths: At the Frontiers of Reason

    1 in stock

    Maths is everywhere, in everything. It’s in the finest margins of modern sport. It’s in the electrical pulses of our hearts and the flight of every bird. It is our key to secret messages, lost languages and perhaps even the shape of the universe of itself. David Darling and Agnijo Banerjee reveal the mathematics at the farthest reaches of our world – from its role in the plots of novels to how animals employ numerical skills to survive. Along the way they explore what makes a genius, why a seemingly simple problem can confound the best and brightest for decades, and what might be the great discovery of the twenty-first century. As Bertrand Russell once said, ‘mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty’. Banerjee and Darling make sure we see it right again.

    1 in stock

    £9.99

  • How Numbers Work: Discover the strange and beautiful world of mathematics

    John Murray Press How Numbers Work: Discover the strange and beautiful world of mathematics

    1 in stock

    Think of a number between one and ten.No, hang on, let's make this interesting. Between zero and infinity. Even if you stick to the whole numbers, there are a lot to choose from - an infinite number in fact. Throw in decimal fractions and infinity suddenly gets an awful lot bigger (is that even possible?) And then there are the negative numbers, the imaginary numbers, the irrational numbers like pi which never end. It literally never ends.The world of numbers is indeed strange and beautiful. Among its inhabitants are some really notable characters - pi, e, the "imaginary" number i and the famous golden ratio to name just a few. Prime numbers occupy a special status. Zero is very odd indeed: is it a number, or isn't it?How Numbers Work takes a tour of this mind-blowing but beautiful realm of numbers and the mathematical rules that connect them. Not only that, but take a crash course on the biggest unsolved problems that keep mathematicians up at night, find out about the strange and unexpected ways mathematics influences our everyday lives, and discover the incredible connection between numbers and reality itself.ABOUT THE SERIESNew Scientist Instant Expert books are definitive and accessible entry points to the most important subjects in science; subjects that challenge, attract debate, invite controversy and engage the most enquiring minds. Designed for curious readers who want to know how things work and why, the Instant Expert series explores the topics that really matter and their impact on individuals, society, and the planet, translating the scientific complexities around us into language that's open to everyone, and putting new ideas and discoveries into perspective and context.

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • How Evolution Explains Everything About Life: From Darwin's brilliant idea to today's epic theory

    John Murray Press How Evolution Explains Everything About Life: From Darwin's brilliant idea to today's epic theory

    1 in stock

    How did we get here? All cultures have a creation story, but a little over 150 years ago Charles Darwin introduced a revolutionary new one. We, and all living things, exist because of the action of evolution on the first simple life form and its descendants.We now know that it has taken 3.8 billions of years of work by the forces of evolution to turn what was once a lump of barren rock into the rich diversity of into plants, animals and microbes that surround us. In the process, evolution has created all manner of useful adaptions, from biological computers (brains) to a system to capture energy from the sun (photosynthesis). But how does evolution actually work? In Evolution, leading biologists and New Scientist take you on a journey of a lifetime, exploring the question of whether life is inevitable or a one-off fluke, and how it got kick-started. Does evolution have a purpose or direction? Are selfish genes really the driving force of evolution? And is evolution itself evolving?ABOUT THE SERIESNew Scientist Instant Expert books are definitive and accessible entry points to the most important subjects in science; subjects that challenge, attract debate, invite controversy and engage the most enquiring minds. Designed for curious readers who want to know how things work and why, the Instant Expert series explores the topics that really matter and their impact on individuals, society, and the planet, translating the scientific complexities around us into language that's open to everyone, and putting new ideas and discoveries into perspective and context.

    1 in stock

    £9.89

  • Rebel Star: Our Quest to Solve the Great Mysteries of the Sun

    Michael O'Mara Books Ltd Rebel Star: Our Quest to Solve the Great Mysteries of the Sun

    1 in stock

    A fascinating and comprehensive guide to the sun – our home star – which remains the greatest mystery in the solar system, and why understanding it is pivotal to our future existence here on Earth.In 1869, a great mystery was born. As astronomers observed a total solar eclipse, for the first time they saw the faint glow of the solar corona, the sun’s outer atmosphere. Measurements of a previously unknown wavelength that made up this solar light sparked hot debate among scientists, but it was another sixty years before they discovered that this wavelength was in fact iron being burned at a staggering 3 million degrees Celsius. With the sun’s surface only 6,000 degrees, this shouldn’t be possible. What we now knew about the sun appeared to defy the laws of physics – and nature.But as well as being shrouded in intriguing mystery, the unpredictable nature of the sun’s corona poses a serious threat to our life here on earth – the destructive potential of solar storms, caused by solar material travelling out into space at around 1 million miles an hour, is huge. Remaining beyond our reach until now, a new generation of ambitious solar missions are currently travelling closer to the sun than any previous spacecraft in history. As we enter this unprecedented era of heliophysics, there has never been a better time to get to grips with the workings of our home star.

    1 in stock

    £15.29

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